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More than 60 papers are citing Araponics !

Arabidopsis // Brachypodium // Rice // Tobacco

Arabidopsis

  • [DOI] I. Jauregui, P. Mª. Aparicio-Tejo, E. Baroja, C. Avila, and I. Aranjuelo, “Elevated CO2 improved the growth of a double nitrate reductase defective mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana: The importance of maintaining a high energy status,” Environmental and experimental botany, vol. 140, pp. 110-119, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{jauregui_elevated_2017,
    title = {Elevated {CO}2 improved the growth of a double nitrate reductase defective mutant of {Arabidopsis} thaliana: {The} importance of maintaining a high energy status},
    volume = {140},
    issn = {0098-8472},
    shorttitle = {Elevated {CO}2 improved the growth of a double nitrate reductase defective mutant of {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847217301363},
    doi = {10.1016/j.envexpbot.2017.06.003},
    abstract = {Impairments in leaf nitrogen (N) assimilation in C3 plants have been identified as processes conditioning photosynthesis under elevated [CO2], especially when N is supplied as nitrate. Leaf N status is usually improved under ammonium nutrition and elevated [CO2]. However, ammonium fertilization is usually accompanied by the appearance of oxidative stress symptoms, which constrains plant development. To understand how the limitations of direct fertilization with ammonium (growth reduction attributed to ammonium toxicity) can be overcome, the effects of elevated [CO2] (800ppm) exposure were studied in the Arabidopsis thaliana double nitrate reductase defective mutant, nia1-1/chl3-5 (which preferentially assimilates ammonium as its nitrogen source). Analysis of the physiology, metabolites and gene expression was carried out in roots and shoot organs. Our study clearly showed that elevated [CO2] improved the inhibited phenotype of the nitrate reductase double mutant. Both the photosynthetic rates and the leaf N content of the NR mutant under elevated CO2 were similar to wild type plants. The growth of the nitrate reductase mutant was linked to its ability to overcome ammonium-associated photoinhibition processes at 800ppm [CO2]. More specifically: (i) the capacity of NR mutants to equilibrate energy availability, as reflected by the electron transport equilibrium reached (photosynthesis, photorespiration and respiration), (ii) as well as by the upregulation of genes involved in stress tolerance were identified as the processes involved in the improved performance of NR mutants.},
    urldate = {2017-07-18},
    journal = {Environmental and Experimental Botany},
    author = {Jauregui, Ivan and Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro Mª and Baroja, Edurne and Avila, Concepción and Aranjuelo, Iker},
    month = aug,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {ammonium, [CO], Nitrate reductase, photosynthesis, Plant physiology, Redox, Root-to-shoot, Transcriptomics},
    pages = {110--119},
    file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/3BJU6TWR/S0098847217301363.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] O. Alabdallah, A. Ahou, N. Mancuso, V. Pompili, A. Macone, D. Pashkoulov, P. Stano, A. Cona, R. Angelini, and P. Tavladoraki, “The Arabidopsis polyamine oxidase/dehydrogenase 5 interferes with cytokinin and auxin signaling pathways to control xylem differentiation,” Journal of experimental botany, vol. 68, iss. 5, pp. 997-1012, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{alabdallah_arabidopsis_2017,
    title = {The {Arabidopsis} polyamine oxidase/dehydrogenase 5 interferes with cytokinin and auxin signaling pathways to control xylem differentiation},
    volume = {68},
    issn = {0022-0957},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/68/5/997/2990158/The-Arabidopsis-polyamine-oxidase-dehydrogenase-5},
    doi = {10.1093/jxb/erw510},
    abstract = {In plants, the polyamines putrescine, spermidine, spermine (Spm), and thermospermine (Therm-Spm) participate in several physiological processes. In particular, Therm-Spm is involved in the control of xylem differentiation, having an auxin antagonizing effect. Polyamine oxidases (PAOs) are FAD-dependent enzymes involved in polyamine catabolism. In Arabidopsis, five PAOs are present, among which AtPAO5 catalyzes the back-conversion of Spm, Therm-Spm, and N1-acetyl-Spm to spermidine. In the present study, it is shown that two loss-of-function atpao5 mutants and a 35S::AtPAO5 Arabidopsis transgenic line present phenotypical differences from the wild-type plants with regard to stem and root elongation, differences that are accompanied by changes in polyamine levels and the number of xylem vessels. It is additionally shown that cytokinin treatment, which up-regulates AtPAO5 expression in roots, differentially affects protoxylem differentiation in 35S::AtPAO5, atpao5, and wild-type roots. Together with these findings, Therm-Spm biosynthetic genes, as well as auxin-, xylem-, and cytokinin-related genes (such as ACL5, SAMDC4, PIN1, PIN6, VND6, VND7, ATHB8, PHB, CNA, PXY, XTH3, XCP1, and AHP6) are shown to be differentially expressed in the various genotypes. These data suggest that AtPAO5, being involved in the control of Therm-Spm homeostasis, participates in the tightly controlled interplay between auxin and cytokinins that is necessary for proper xylem differentiation.},
    number = {5},
    urldate = {2017-07-18},
    journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
    author = {Alabdallah, Osama and Ahou, Abdellah and Mancuso, Namrata and Pompili, Valerio and Macone, Alberto and Pashkoulov, Dimitre and Stano, Pasquale and Cona, Alessandra and Angelini, Riccardo and Tavladoraki, Paraskevi},
    month = feb,
    year = {2017},
    pages = {997--1012},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/ER8P4WVU/Alabdallah et al. - 2017 - The Arabidopsis polyamine oxidasedehydrogenase 5 .pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/F3BIP83U/The-Arabidopsis-polyamine-oxidase-dehydrogenase-5.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. Podgórska, M. Burian, A. M. Rychter, A. G. Rasmusson, and B. Szal, “Short-term ammonium supply induces cellular defence to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis leaves,” Physiologia plantarum, p. n/a–n/a, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{podgorska_short-term_2017,
    title = {Short-term ammonium supply induces cellular defence to prevent oxidative stress in {Arabidopsis} leaves},
    issn = {1399-3054},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppl.12538/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/ppl.12538},
    abstract = {Plants can assimilate nitrogen from soil pools of both ammonium and nitrate, and the relative levels of these two nitrogen sources are highly variable in soil. Long-term ammonium nutrition is known to cause damage to Arabidopsis that has been linked to mitochondrial oxidative stress. Using hydroponic cultures, we analysed the consequences of rapid shifts between nitrate and ammonium nutrition. This did not induce growth retardation, showing that Arabidopsis can compensate for the changes in redox metabolism associated with the variations in nitrogen redox status. During the first 3 h of ammonium treatment, we observed distinct transient shifts in reactive oxygen species (ROS), low-mass antioxidants, ROS-scavenging enzymes, and mitochondrial alternative electron transport pathways, indicating rapid but temporally separated changes in chloroplastic, mitochondrial and cytosolic ROS metabolism. The fast induction of antioxidant defences significantly lowered intracellular H2O2 levels, and thus protected Arabidopsis leaves from oxidative stress. On the other hand elevated extracellular ROS production in response to ammonium supply may be involved in signalling. The response pattern displays an intricate plasticity of Arabidopsis redox metabolism to minimise stress in responses to nutrient changes.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Physiologia Plantarum},
    author = {Podgórska, Anna and Burian, Maria and Rychter, Anna M. and Rasmusson, Allan G. and Szal, Bożena},
    month = feb,
    year = {2017},
    pages = {n/a--n/a},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/S3US9FWH/Podgórska et al. - 2017 - Short-term ammonium supply induces cellular defenc.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/C8GJ2T3U/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • H. Canut, C. Albenne, and E. Jamet, “Isolation of the Cell Wall,” in Isolation of Plant Organelles and Structures, N. L. Taylor and H. A. Millar, Eds., Springer New York, 2017, pp. 171-185.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{taylor_isolation_2017,
    series = {Methods in {Molecular} {Biology}},
    title = {Isolation of the {Cell} {Wall}},
    copyright = {©2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York},
    isbn = {978-1-4939-6531-1},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-6533-5_14},
    abstract = {This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90–95 \% in mass) and of proteins (5–10 \%). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 \%) and lignin (about 35 \%). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.},
    language = {English},
    number = {1511},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    booktitle = {Isolation of {Plant} {Organelles} and {Structures}},
    publisher = {Springer New York},
    author = {Canut, Hervé and Albenne, Cécile and Jamet, Elisabeth},
    editor = {Taylor, Nicolas L. and Millar, A. Harvey},
    month = jan,
    year = {2017},
    note = {DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6533-5\_14},
    keywords = {Cell fractionation, Cell wall protein, Plant, Polysaccharides, Proteomics, Recombinant protein production},
    pages = {171--185}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Landa, S. Prerostova, L. Langhansova, P. Marsik, and T. Vanek, “Transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. roots to ibuprofen,” International journal of phytoremediation, vol. 19, iss. 8, pp. 695-700, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{landa_transcriptomic_2017,
    title = {Transcriptomic response of {Arabidopsis} thaliana ({L}.) {Heynh}. roots to ibuprofen},
    volume = {19},
    issn = {1522-6514},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2016.1267697},
    doi = {10.1080/15226514.2016.1267697},
    abstract = {Surface waters in urban areas are contaminated by ibuprofen (IBP), a popular and extensively used anti-inflammatory drug. In this study, we investigated the transcriptomic response in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. roots with the aim of revealing genes that are potentially involved in IBP detoxification and elucidating the effect of IBP on plants. IBP upregulated 63 and downregulated 38 transcripts (p-value {\textless} 0.1, fold change ≥2) after 2-day exposure to a 5-µM (1.03 mg/L) concentration of IBP under hydroponic conditions. Although the IBP concentration used in the experiment was highly relative to the concentrations found in rivers and wastewater, the number of genes with transcriptional changes was relatively low. The upregulation of cytochrome P450s, glutathione S-transferases, and UDP-glycosyltransferases indicates the occurrence of IBP oxidation in the first phase, followed by conjugation with glutathione and sugar in the second detoxification phase. ABC transporters could be involved in the transport of IBP and its metabolites. The identification of genes potentially involved in IBP detoxification could be useful in an IBP phytoremediation approach.},
    number = {8},
    urldate = {2017-07-18},
    journal = {International Journal of Phytoremediation},
    author = {Landa, Premysl and Prerostova, Sylva and Langhansova, Lenka and Marsik, Petr and Vanek, Tomas},
    month = aug,
    year = {2017},
    pmid = {28398082},
    keywords = {detoxification, Gene expression, metabolism of xenobiotics, microarrays, phytoremediation},
    pages = {695--700},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/AINWDHH3/Landa et al. - 2017 - Transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/FFIKEK9V/15226514.2016.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] R. Vankova, P. Landa, R. Podlipna, P. I. Dobrev, S. Prerostova, L. Langhansova, A. Gaudinova, K. Motkova, V. Knirsch, and T. Vanek, “ZnO nanoparticle effects on hormonal pools in Arabidopsis thaliana,” Science of the total environment, vol. 593, pp. 535-542, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{vankova_zno_2017,
    title = {{ZnO} nanoparticle effects on hormonal pools in {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {593},
    issn = {0048-9697},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969717306812},
    doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.03.160},
    abstract = {At present, nanoparticles have been more and more used in a wide range of areas. However, very little is known about the mechanisms of their impact on plants, as both positive and negative effects have been reported. As plant interactions with the environment are mediated by plant hormones, complex phytohormone analysis has been performed in order to characterize the effect of ZnO nanoparticles (mean size 30nm, concentration range 0.16–100mgL−1) on Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Taking into account that plant hormones exhibit high tissue-specificity as well as an intensive cross-talk in the regulation of growth and development as well as defense, plant responses were followed by determination of the content of five main phytohormones (cytokinins, auxins, abscisic acid, salicylic acid and jasmonic acid) in apices, leaves and roots. Increasing nanoparticle concentration was associated with gradually suppressed biosynthesis of the growth promoting hormones cytokinins and auxins in shoot apical meristems (apices). In contrast, cis-zeatin, a cytokinin associated with stress responses, was elevated by 280\% and 590\% upon exposure to nanoparticle concentrations 20 and 100mgL−1, respectively, in roots. Higher ZnO nanoparticle doses resulted in up-regulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid, mainly in apices and leaves. In case of salicylic acid, stimulation was found in leaves and roots. The other stress hormone jasmonic acid (as well as its active metabolite jasmonate isoleucine) was suppressed at the presence of nanoparticles. The earliest response to nanoparticles, associated with down-regulation of growth as well as of cytokinins and auxins, was observed in apices. At higher dose, up-regulation of abscisic acid, was detected. This increase, together with elevation of the other stress hormone - salicylic acid, indicates that plants sense nanoparticles as severe stress. Gradual accumulation of cis-zeatin in roots may contribute to relatively higher stress resistance of this tissue.},
    urldate = {2017-07-18},
    journal = {Science of The Total Environment},
    author = {Vankova, Radomira and Landa, Premysl and Podlipna, Radka and Dobrev, Petre I. and Prerostova, Sylva and Langhansova, Lenka and Gaudinova, Alena and Motkova, Katerina and Knirsch, Vojtech and Vanek, Tomas},
    month = sep,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {Abscisic acid, Cytokinin, Plant hormone, ZnO nanoparticle},
    pages = {535--542},
    file = {ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/NAXCPBNN/S0048969717306812.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. B. Feria, N. Bosch, A. Sánchez, A. I. Nieto-Ingelmo, C. de la Osa, C. Echevarría, S. García-Mauriño, and J. A. Monreal, “Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and PEPC-kinase (PEPC-k) isoenzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana: role in control and abiotic stress conditions,” Planta, vol. 244, iss. 4, pp. 901-913, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{feria_phosphoenolpyruvate_2016,
    title = {Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase ({PEPC}) and {PEPC}-kinase ({PEPC}-k) isoenzymes in {Arabidopsis} thaliana: role in control and abiotic stress conditions},
    volume = {244},
    issn = {0032-0935, 1432-2048},
    shorttitle = {Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase ({PEPC}) and {PEPC}-kinase ({PEPC}-k) isoenzymes in {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00425-016-2556-9},
    doi = {10.1007/s00425-016-2556-9},
    abstract = {Main conclusionArabidopsisppc3mutant has a growth-arrest phenotype and is affected in phosphate- and salt-stress responses, showing that this protein is crucial under control or stress conditions.Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and its dedicated kinase (PEPC-k) are ubiquitous plant proteins implicated in many physiological processes. This work investigates specific roles for the three plant-type PEPC (PTPC) and the two PEPC-k isoenzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The lack of any of the PEPC isoenzymes reduced growth parameters under optimal growth conditions. PEPC activity was decreased in shoots and roots of ppc2 and ppc3 mutants, respectively. Phosphate starvation increased the expression of all PTPC and PPCK genes in shoots, but only PPC3 and PPCK2 in roots. The absence of any of these two proteins was not compensated by other isoforms in roots. The effect of salt stress on PTPC and PPCK expression was modest in shoots, but PPC3 was markedly increased in roots. Interestingly, both stresses decreased root growth in each of the mutants except for ppc3. This mutant had a stressed phenotype in control conditions (reduced root growth and high level of stress molecular markers), but was unaffected in their response to high salinity. Salt stress increased PEPC activity, its phosphorylation state, and L-malate content in roots, all these responses were abolished in the ppc3 mutant. Our results highlight the importance of the PPC3 isoenzyme for the normal development of plants and for root responses to stress.},
    language = {en},
    number = {4},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Planta},
    author = {Feria, Ana B. and Bosch, Nadja and Sánchez, Alfonso and Nieto-Ingelmo, Ana I. and Osa, Clara de la and Echevarría, Cristina and García-Mauriño, Sofía and Monreal, Jose Antonio},
    month = oct,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {901--913},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/44G882AH/Feria et al. - 2016 - Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and PEPC-ki.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/HGQW5I94/s00425-016-2556-9.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] I. Jauregui, P. M. Aparicio-Tejo, C. Avila, R. Cañas, S. Sakalauskiene, and I. Aranjuelo, “Root–shoot interactions explain the reduction of leaf mineral content in Arabidopsis plants grown under elevated [CO2] conditions,” Physiologia plantarum, vol. 158, iss. 1, pp. 65-79, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{jauregui_rootshoot_2016,
    title = {Root–shoot interactions explain the reduction of leaf mineral content in {Arabidopsis} plants grown under elevated [{CO}2] conditions},
    volume = {158},
    issn = {1399-3054},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ppl.12417/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/ppl.12417},
    abstract = {Although shoot N depletion in plants exposed to elevated [CO2] has already been reported on several occasions, some uncertainty remains about the mechanisms involved. This study illustrates (1) the importance of characterizing root–shoot interactions and (2) the physiological, biochemical and gene expression mechanisms adopted by nitrate-fed Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under elevated [CO2]. Elevated [CO2] increases biomass and photosynthetic rates; nevertheless, the decline in total soluble protein, Rubisco and leaf N concentrations revealed a general decrease in leaf N availability. A transcriptomic approach (conducted at the root and shoot level) revealed that exposure to 800 ppm [CO2] induced the expression of genes involved in the transport of nitrate and mineral elements. Leaf N and mineral status revealed that N assimilation into proteins was constrained under elevated [CO2]. Moreover, this study also highlights how elevated [CO2] induced the reorganization of nitrate assimilation between tissues; root nitrogen assimilation was favored over leaf assimilation to offset the decline in nitrogen metabolism in the leaves of plants exposed to elevated [CO2].},
    language = {en},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Physiologia Plantarum},
    author = {Jauregui, Ivan and Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M. and Avila, Concepción and Cañas, Rafael and Sakalauskiene, Sandra and Aranjuelo, Iker},
    month = sep,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {65--79},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/BIS54A6E/Jauregui et al. - 2016 - Root–shoot interactions explain the reduction of l.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CMSK3DTR/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Laxa, K. Müller, N. Lange, L. Doering, J. T. Pruscha, and C. Peterhänsel, “The 5’UTR intron of the Arabidopsis GGT1 aminotransferase enhances promoter activity by recruiting RNA polymerase II,” Plant physiology, p. pp.00881.2016, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{laxa_5utr_2016,
    title = {The 5'{UTR} intron of the {Arabidopsis} {GGT}1 aminotransferase enhances promoter activity by recruiting {RNA} polymerase {II}},
    issn = {, 1532-2548},
    url = {http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/early/2016/07/19/pp.16.00881},
    doi = {10.1104/pp.16.00881},
    abstract = {Photorespiration is essential for the detoxification of glycolate and recycling of carbon to the Calvin Benson Bassham cycle. Enzymes participating in the pathway have been identified and investigations now focus on the regulation of photorespiration by transporters and metabolites. However, regulation of photorespiration on the gene level has not been intensively studied. Here, we show that maximum transcript abundance and light response of glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (GGT1) is regulated by intron-mediated enhancement (IME) of the 5' leader intron rather than by regulatory elements in the 5' upstream region. The intron is rich in CT-stretches and contains the motif TGTGATTTG that is highly similar to the IME-related motif TTNGATYTG. The GGT1 intron also confers mesophyll specific expression of foreign promoters. Quantitative PCR analysis and GUS activity measurements revealed that IME of the GGT1 5'UTR intron is controlled on the transcriptional level. IME by the GGT1 5'UTR intron was at least 2-fold. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the abundance of RNA polymerase II binding to the intron less construct is reduced.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Physiology},
    author = {Laxa, Miriam and Müller, Kristin and Lange, Natalie and Doering, Lennart and Pruscha, Jan Thomas and Peterhänsel, Christoph},
    month = jul,
    year = {2016},
    pmid = {27418588},
    pages = {pp.00881.2016},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/2BV4Q45I/Laxa et al. - 2016 - The 5'UTR intron of the Arabidopsis GGT1 aminotran.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/K44WER7S/pp.16.00881.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] F. Bouché, M. D’Aloia, P. Tocquin, G. Lobet, N. Detry, and C. Périlleux, “Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in Arabidopsis thaliana,” Scientific reports, vol. 6, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{bouche_integrating_2016,
    title = {Integrating roots into a whole plant network of flowering time genes in {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {6},
    issn = {2045-2322},
    url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4926122/},
    doi = {10.1038/srep29042},
    abstract = {Molecular data concerning the involvement of roots in the genetic pathways regulating floral transition are lacking. In this study, we performed global analyses of the root transcriptome in Arabidopsis in order to identify flowering time genes that are expressed in the roots and genes that are differentially expressed in the roots during the induction of flowering. Data mining of public microarray experiments uncovered that about 200 genes whose mutations are reported to alter flowering time are expressed in the roots (i.e. were detected in more than 50\% of the microarrays). However, only a few flowering integrator genes passed the analysis cutoff. Comparison of root transcriptome in short days and during synchronized induction of flowering by a single 22-h long day revealed that 595 genes were differentially expressed. Enrichment analyses of differentially expressed genes in root tissues, gene ontology categories, and cis-regulatory elements converged towards sugar signaling. We concluded that roots are integrated in systemic signaling, whereby carbon supply coordinates growth at the whole plant level during the induction of flowering. This coordination could involve the root circadian clock and cytokinin biosynthesis as a feed forward loop towards the shoot.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Scientific Reports},
    author = {Bouché, Frédéric and D’Aloia, Maria and Tocquin, Pierre and Lobet, Guillaume and Detry, Nathalie and Périlleux, Claire},
    month = jun,
    year = {2016},
    pmid = {27352932},
    pmcid = {PMC4926122},
    file = {PubMed Central Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/UCFJJFEW/Bouché et al. - 2016 - Integrating roots into a whole plant network of fl.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Stahl, P. Bellwon, S. Huber, K. Schlaeppi, F. Bernsdorff, A. Vallat-Michel, F. Mauch, and J. Zeier, “Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance,” Molecular plant, vol. 9, iss. 5, pp. 662-681, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{stahl_regulatory_2016,
    title = {Regulatory and {Functional} {Aspects} of {Indolic} {Metabolism} in {Plant} {Systemic} {Acquired} {Resistance}},
    volume = {9},
    issn = {1674-2052},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1674205216000071},
    doi = {10.1016/j.molp.2016.01.005},
    abstract = {Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR.},
    number = {5},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Molecular Plant},
    author = {Stahl, Elia and Bellwon, Patricia and Huber, Stefan and Schlaeppi, Klaus and Bernsdorff, Friederike and Vallat-Michel, Armelle and Mauch, Felix and Zeier, Jürgen},
    month = may,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, indolic metabolism, Pseudomonas syringae, systemic acquired resistance},
    pages = {662--681},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/MM8KP5BC/Stahl et al. - 2016 - Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metab.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/XF22CERX/S1674205216000071.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] R. Pratelli, S. Boyd, and G. Pilot, “Analysis of amino acid uptake and translocation in Arabidopsis with a low-cost hydroponic system,” Journal of plant nutrition and soil science, vol. 179, iss. 2, pp. 286-293, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{pratelli_analysis_2016,
    title = {Analysis of amino acid uptake and translocation in {Arabidopsis} with a low-cost hydroponic system},
    volume = {179},
    issn = {1522-2624},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jpln.201500464/abstract},
    doi = {10.1002/jpln.201500464},
    abstract = {In soils, amino acids may be an important source of nitrogen for plants, at least in those where organic matter is not quickly degraded. The physiology of uptake of amino acids by roots was mainly studied in the 70's and 80's, before genes encoding amino acid importers were cloned in the 90's. While two families of amino acid transporters have been identified, yielding a total of about 100 genes, the role of each member is yet to be elucidated. As a tool for studying the role of amino acid transporters from Arabidopsis we set up a new hydroponic system suitable for radioisotope use. This system enables reproducible amino acid uptake by roots and estimation of the transport to the shoots of the amino acid taken up. We show that the rates of glutamine (Gln) uptake by wild-type roots and transfer to the shoots were linear, and that other tested amino acids were translocated to the shoots with lower efficiency than Gln. A T-DNA insertion mutant for a Gln exporter was compared to the wild-type plants. Gln uptake and transfer were similar in both genotypes, showing that the suppression of the exporter did not affect uptake or transfer of amino acids to the shoots. The main advantage of the hydroponic system presented here is that all the materials used to grow Arabidopsis are virtually free and can therefore be discarded, a useful feature when working with radioactivity.},
    language = {en},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science},
    author = {Pratelli, Réjane and Boyd, Shelton and Pilot, Guillaume},
    month = apr,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {hydroponic system, membrane transport, nutrient translocation, nutrient uptake},
    pages = {286--293},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/UVX2U9BS/Pratelli et al. - 2016 - Analysis of amino acid uptake and translocation in.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/GJ5RSJ8A/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Trapet, L. Avoscan, A. Klinguer, S. Pateyron, S. Citerne, C. Chervin, S. Mazurier, P. Lemanceau, D. Wendehenne, and A. Besson-Bard, “The Pseudomonas fluorescens siderophore pyoverdine weakens Arabidopsis thaliana defense in favour of growth in iron-deficient conditions,” Plant physiology, p. pp.01537.2015, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{trapet_pseudomonas_2016,
    title = {The {Pseudomonas} fluorescens siderophore pyoverdine weakens {Arabidopsis} thaliana defense in favour of growth in iron-deficient conditions},
    issn = {, 1532-2548},
    url = {http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/early/2016/03/08/pp.15.01537},
    doi = {10.1104/pp.15.01537},
    abstract = {Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from P. fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under iron-sufficient or -deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. A microarray analysis showed that under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in irt1 and fro2 knock-out mutants and was prioritized over immunity as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to the pathogen Botrytis cinerea. This process was accompanied by an over-expression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross-talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status.},
    language = {en},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Physiology},
    author = {Trapet, Pauline and Avoscan, Laure and Klinguer, Agnès and Pateyron, Stéphanie and Citerne, Sylvie and Chervin, Christian and Mazurier, Sylvie and Lemanceau, Philippe and Wendehenne, David and Besson-Bard, Angélique},
    month = mar,
    year = {2016},
    pmid = {26956666},
    pages = {pp.01537.2015},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/ECUGE6HU/Trapet et al. - 2016 - The Pseudomonas fluorescens siderophore pyoverdine.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/68NRZS47/pp.15.01537.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Laurent, G. Lekeux, A. A. Ukuwela, Z. Xiao, J. Charlier, B. Bosman, M. Carnol, P. Motte, C. Damblon, M. Galleni, and M. Hanikenne, “Metal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PIB ATPase HMA4 is required for metal transport in Arabidopsis,” Plant molecular biology, vol. 90, iss. 4-5, pp. 453-466, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{laurent_metal_2016,
    title = {Metal binding to the {N}-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the {PIB} {ATPase} {HMA}4 is required for metal transport in {Arabidopsis}},
    volume = {90},
    issn = {0167-4412, 1573-5028},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11103-016-0429-z},
    doi = {10.1007/s11103-016-0429-z},
    abstract = {PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding domains, which may be involved in metal sensing, metal ion selectivity and/or in regulation of the pump activity. The PIB ATPase HMA4 (Heavy Metal ATPase 4) plays a central role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and has a key function in zinc and cadmium hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation in the extremophile plant species Arabidopsis halleri. Here, we examined the function and structure of the N-terminal cytoplasmic metal-binding domain of HMA4. We mutagenized a conserved CCTSE metal-binding motif in the domain and assessed the impact of the mutations on protein function and localization in planta, on metal-binding properties in vitro and on protein structure by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The two Cys residues of the motif are essential for the function, but not for localization, of HMA4 in planta, whereas the Glu residue is important but not essential. These residues also determine zinc coordination and affinity. Zinc binding to the N-terminal domain is thus crucial for HMA4 protein function, whereas it is not required to maintain the protein structure. Altogether, combining in vivo and in vitro approaches in our study provides insights towards the molecular understanding of metal transport and specificity of metal P-type ATPases.},
    language = {en},
    number = {4-5},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Molecular Biology},
    author = {Laurent, Clémentine and Lekeux, Gilles and Ukuwela, Ashwinie A. and Xiao, Zhiguang and Charlier, Jean-Benoit and Bosman, Bernard and Carnol, Monique and Motte, Patrick and Damblon, Christian and Galleni, Moreno and Hanikenne, Marc},
    month = mar,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {453--466},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/48DGBPWH/Laurent et al. - 2016 - Metal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/HHPIRFUE/s11103-016-0429-z.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] Y. Koo, E. Y. Lukianova-Hleb, J. Pan, S. M. Thompson, D. O. Lapotko, and J. Braam, “In Planta Response of Arabidopsis to Photothermal Impact Mediated by Gold Nanoparticles,” Small, vol. 12, iss. 5, pp. 623-630, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{koo_planta_2016,
    title = {In {Planta} {Response} of {Arabidopsis} to {Photothermal} {Impact} {Mediated} by {Gold} {Nanoparticles}},
    volume = {12},
    issn = {1613-6829},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/smll.201502461/abstract},
    doi = {10.1002/smll.201502461},
    abstract = {Biological responses to photothermal effects of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been demonstrated and employed for various applications in diverse systems except for one important class – plants. Here, the uptake of GNPs through Arabidopsis thaliana roots and translocation to leaves are reported. Successful plasmonic nanobubble generation and acoustic signal detection in planta is demonstrated. Furthermore, Arabidopsis leaves harboring GNPs and exposed to continuous laser or noncoherent light show elevated temperatures across the leaf surface and induced expression of heat-shock regulated genes. Overall, these results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can readily take up GNPs through the roots and translocate the particles to leaf tissues. Once within leaves, GNPs can act as photothermal agents for on-demand remote activation of localized biological processes in plants.},
    language = {en},
    number = {5},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Small},
    author = {Koo, Yeonjong and Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y. and Pan, Joann and Thompson, Sean M. and Lapotko, Dmitri O. and Braam, Janet},
    month = feb,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {623--630},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/9JE4HUNM/Koo et al. - 2016 - In Planta Response of Arabidopsis to Photothermal .pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/T2CMNUPM/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Ostaszewska-Bugajska and I. M. Juszczuk, “Changes in the OXPHOS system in leaf and root mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to long-term sulphur deficiency,” Acta physiologiae plantarum, vol. 38, iss. 6, p. 141, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{ostaszewska-bugajska_changes_2016,
    title = {Changes in the {OXPHOS} system in leaf and root mitochondria of {Arabidopsis} thaliana subjected to long-term sulphur deficiency},
    volume = {38},
    issn = {0137-5881, 1861-1664},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11738-016-2155-1},
    doi = {10.1007/s11738-016-2155-1},
    abstract = {Long-term sulphur (S) deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana affects the functioning of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) via alteration of the multisubunit NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I; EC 1.6.5.3), which contains several iron–sulphur clusters. Densitometric analysis of bands of respiratory chain complexes after one-dimensional blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) showed that levels and in-gel capacities of Complex I in leaf and root mitochondria were lower than those of the control. Two-dimensional BN/SDS-PAGE showed lower abundance of all Complex I subunits, but the qualitative structural composition (subunit expression and mobility) did not change. In mitochondria of S-deficient A. thaliana, impairment of Complex I could be compensated to some extent by additional type II NADH dehydrogenases that do not contain iron–sulphur clusters. The level and capacity of external NADH dehydrogenases in leaf and root mitochondria was higher under S deficiency, but that of internal NADH dehydrogenases did not differ from the control. The amount of COXII (mitochondrial-encoded subunit of cytochrome c oxidase in Complex IV; EC 1.9.3.1) and the capacity of Complex IV were lower under S deficiency, but levels of alternative oxidase, a bypass to Complex IV, did not change. We discuss S deficiency in A. thaliana in relation to the assembly and stability of Complex I and to a bypass of Complex I by external type II NADH dehydrogenases.},
    language = {en},
    number = {6},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Acta Physiologiae Plantarum},
    author = {Ostaszewska-Bugajska, Monika and Juszczuk, Izabela M.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {141},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/I7DDG9W5/Ostaszewska-Bugajska and Juszczuk - 2016 - Changes in the OXPHOS system in leaf and root mito.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/9NTQ3RZM/s11738-016-2155-1.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] R. Álvarez-Aragón, R. Haro, B. Benito, and A. Rodríguez-Navarro, “Salt intolerance in Arabidopsis: shoot and root sodium toxicity, and inhibition by sodium-plus-potassium overaccumulation,” Planta, vol. 243, iss. 1, pp. 97-114, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{alvarez-aragon_salt_2016,
    title = {Salt intolerance in {Arabidopsis}: shoot and root sodium toxicity, and inhibition by sodium-plus-potassium overaccumulation},
    volume = {243},
    issn = {0032-0935, 1432-2048},
    shorttitle = {Salt intolerance in {Arabidopsis}},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00425-015-2400-7},
    doi = {10.1007/s00425-015-2400-7},
    abstract = {Main conclusionArabidopsis plants in NaCl suffering half growth inhibition do not suffer osmotic stress and seldom shoot Na+toxicity; overaccumulation of Na+plus K+might trigger the inhibition.It is widely assumed that salinity inhibits plant growth by osmotic stress and shoot Na+ toxicity. This study aims to examine the growth inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana by NaCl concentrations that allow the completion of the life cycle. Unaffected Col-0 wild-type plants were used to define nontoxic Na+ contents; Na+ toxicities in shoots and roots were analyzed in hkt1 and sos1 mutants, respectively. The growth inhibition of Col-0 plants at 40 mM Na+ was mild and equivalent to that produced by 8 and 4 mM Na+ in hkt1 and sos1 plants, respectively. Therefore, these mutants allowed to study the toxicity of Na+ in the absence of an osmotic challenge. Col-0 and Ts-1 accessions showed very different Na+ contents but similar growth inhibitions; Ts-1 plants showed very high leaf Na+ contents but no symptoms of Na+ toxicity. Ak-1, C24, and Fei-0 plants were highly affected by NaCl showing evident symptoms of shoot Na+ toxicity. Increasing K+ in isotonic NaCl/KCl combinations dramatically decreased the Na+ content in all Arabidopsis accessions and eliminated the signs of Na+ toxicity in most of them but did not relieve growth inhibition. This suggested that the dominant inhibition in these conditions was either osmotic or of an ionic nature unspecific for Na+ or K+. Col-0 and Ts-1 plants growing in sorbitol showed a clear osmotic stress characterized by a notable decrease of their water content, but this response did not occur in NaCl. Overaccumulation of Na+ plus K+ might trigger growth reduction in NaCl-treated plants.},
    language = {en},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Planta},
    author = {Álvarez-Aragón, Rocío and Haro, Rosario and Benito, Begoña and Rodríguez-Navarro, Alonso},
    month = jan,
    year = {2016},
    pages = {97--114},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/8T9KMPD4/Álvarez-Aragón et al. - 2016 - Salt intolerance in Arabidopsis shoot and root so.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/RTJC39WU/s00425-015-2400-7.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] H. Nguyen-Kim, H. San Clemente, T. Balliau, M. Zivy, C. Dunand, C. Albenne, and E. Jamet, “Arabidopsis thaliana root cell wall proteomics: Increasing the proteome coverage using a combinatorial peptide ligand library and description of unexpected Hyp in peroxidase amino acid sequences,” Proteomics, vol. 16, iss. 3, pp. 491-503, 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{nguyen-kim_arabidopsis_2016,
    title = {Arabidopsis thaliana root cell wall proteomics: {Increasing} the proteome coverage using a combinatorial peptide ligand library and description of unexpected {Hyp} in peroxidase amino acid sequences},
    volume = {16},
    issn = {1615-9861},
    shorttitle = {Arabidopsis thaliana root cell wall proteomics},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pmic.201500129/abstract},
    doi = {10.1002/pmic.201500129},
    abstract = {Plant cell walls (CWs) contain a large proportion of polysaccharides (90–95\% of CW mass) and proteins (5–10\%) that play major roles in CW plasticity during development and in response to environmental cues. Here, we present CW proteomics data of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Plants were cultivated in hydroponic conditions. CW protein (CWP) extracts were prepared and analyzed in two different ways in order to enlarge the coverage of the root CW proteome: proteins were analyzed either directly or following an affinity chromatography on a combinatorial peptide ligand library (CPLL) to reduce the concentration dynamic range. Proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics. Altogether, 424 proteins having predicted signal peptides have been identified (CWPs). CPLL permitted to identify low-abundant CWPs never described before, thus enlarging the coverage of the root CW proteome. The number of oxidoreductases is particularly high and includes a large collection of class III peroxidases (CIII Prxs; 38 out of the 73 A. thaliana CIII Prxs). For the first time, hydroxyproline residues were localized at conserved positions in CIII Prx amino acid sequences.},
    language = {en},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {PROTEOMICS},
    author = {Nguyen-Kim, Huan and San Clemente, Hélène and Balliau, Thierry and Zivy, Michel and Dunand, Christophe and Albenne, Cécile and Jamet, Elisabeth},
    month = feb,
    year = {2016},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis},
    pages = {491--503},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/VJDGFU6N/Nguyen-Kim et al. - 2016 - Arabidopsis thaliana root cell wall proteomics In.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/JBG2BGCD/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Jiménez-Arias, A. A. Borges, J. C. Luis, F. Valdés, L. M. Sandalio, and J. A. Pérez, “Priming effect of menadione sodium bisulphite against salinity stress in Arabidopsis involves epigenetic changes in genes controlling proline metabolism,” Environmental and experimental botany, vol. 120, pp. 23-30, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{jimenez-arias_priming_2015,
    title = {Priming effect of menadione sodium bisulphite against salinity stress in {Arabidopsis} involves epigenetic changes in genes controlling proline metabolism},
    volume = {120},
    issn = {0098-8472},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847215300034},
    doi = {10.1016/j.envexpbot.2015.07.003},
    abstract = {Plants are able to develop numerous defence strategies to face stress. Amongst these, higher plants are capable of demonstrating stress imprint, a mechanism related with the phenomenon of priming. This is usually defined as genetic or biochemical modifications induced by a first stress exposure that leads to enhanced resistance to a later stress. Menadione sodium bisulphite (MSB), a water-soluble addition compound of vitamin K3, was first studied as a plant growth regulator and has been later widely shown to function as plant defence activator against several pathogens in a number of plant species. We recently reported that treating Arabidopsis seeds with MSB primes salt tolerance by inducing an early acclimation to salt stress. Here we describe the analysis of the effect of MSB on cytosine methylation in a salt stress background demonstrating that one of the mechanisms underlying this early acclimation to salt stress is an epigenetic mark. Specifically, MSB leads to a hypomethylation state at the promoter region of genes involved in the biosynthesis (P5CS1) and degradation (ERD5) of proline, affecting mainly CHG and CHH sites(where H is any nucleotide except G). The epigenetic changes detected are correlated with the observed expression patterns of P5CS1 (upregulation) and ERD5 (downregulation) genes and the increase in proline accumulation.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental and Experimental Botany},
    author = {Jiménez-Arias, David and Borges, Andrés A. and Luis, Juan C. and Valdés, Francisco and Sandalio, Luisa M. and Pérez, José A.},
    month = dec,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Defence priming, Epigenetics, Menadione sodium bisulphite, Methylcytosine, Proline, Salt stress, Salt tolerance},
    pages = {23--30},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/67PJQ6QF/Jiménez-Arias et al. - 2015 - Priming effect of menadione sodium bisulphite agai.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/W5K4MDFQ/S0098847215300034.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] I. Jauregui, P. Mª. Aparicio-Tejo, C. Avila, M. Rueda-López, and I. Aranjuelo, “Root and shoot performance of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to elevated CO2: A physiologic, metabolic and transcriptomic response,” Journal of plant physiology, vol. 189, pp. 65-76, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{jauregui_root_2015,
    title = {Root and shoot performance of {Arabidopsis} thaliana exposed to elevated {CO}2: {A} physiologic, metabolic and transcriptomic response},
    volume = {189},
    issn = {0176-1617},
    shorttitle = {Root and shoot performance of {Arabidopsis} thaliana exposed to elevated {CO}2},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176161715002291},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jplph.2015.09.012},
    abstract = {The responsiveness of C3 plants to raised atmospheric [CO2] levels has been frequently described as constrained by photosynthetic downregulation. The main goal of the current study was to characterize the shoot-root relationship and its implications in plant responsiveness under elevated [CO2] conditions. For this purpose, Arabidopsis thaliana plants were exposed to elevated [CO2] (800 ppm versus 400 ppm [CO2]) and fertilized with a mixed (NH4NO3) nitrogen source. Plant growth, physiology, metabolite and transcriptomic characterizations were carried out at the root and shoot levels. Plant growth under elevated [CO2] conditions was doubled due to increased photosynthetic rates and gas exchange measurements revealed that these plants maintain higher photosynthetic rates over extended periods of time. This positive response of photosynthetic rates to elevated [CO2] was caused by the maintenance of leaf protein and Rubisco concentrations at control levels alongside enhanced energy efficiency. The increased levels of leaf carbohydrates, organic acids and amino acids supported the augmented respiration rates of plants under elevated [CO2]. A transcriptomic analysis allowed the identification of photoassimilate allocation and remobilization as fundamental process used by the plants to maintain the outstanding photosynthetic performance. Moreover, based on the relationship between plant carbon status and hormone functioning, the transcriptomic analyses provided an explanation of why phenology accelerates under elevated [CO2] conditions.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Plant Physiology},
    author = {Jauregui, Iván and Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro Mª. and Avila, Concepción and Rueda-López, Marina and Aranjuelo, Iker},
    month = sep,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis, Carbohydrate transport, CO2, photosynthesis, Source-sink, Transcriptomic},
    pages = {65--76},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/6VE5XUKS/Jauregui et al. - 2015 - Root and shoot performance of Arabidopsis thaliana.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/2KABJW3Q/S0176161715002291.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] C. Nouet, J. Charlier, M. Carnol, B. Bosman, F. Farnir, P. Motte, and M. Hanikenne, “Functional analysis of the three HMA4 copies of the metal hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri,” Journal of experimental botany, vol. 66, iss. 19, pp. 5783-5795, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{nouet_functional_2015,
    title = {Functional analysis of the three {HMA}4 copies of the metal hyperaccumulator {Arabidopsis} halleri},
    volume = {66},
    issn = {0022-0957},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/66/19/5783/695937/Functional-analysis-of-the-three-HMA4-copies-of},
    doi = {10.1093/jxb/erv280},
    number = {19},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
    author = {Nouet, Cécile and Charlier, Jean-Benoit and Carnol, Monique and Bosman, Bernard and Farnir, Frédéric and Motte, Patrick and Hanikenne, Marc},
    month = sep,
    year = {2015},
    pages = {5783--5795},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/KDN2XJXM/Nouet et al. - 2015 - Functional analysis of the three HMA4 copies of th.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/VPVD8RWH/Functional-analysis-of-the-three-HMA4-copies-of.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Ostaszewska-Bugajska, A. M. Rychter, and I. M. Juszczuk, “Antioxidative and proteolytic systems protect mitochondria from oxidative damage in S-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana,” Journal of plant physiology, vol. 186–187, pp. 25-38, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{ostaszewska-bugajska_antioxidative_2015,
    title = {Antioxidative and proteolytic systems protect mitochondria from oxidative damage in {S}-deficient {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {186–187},
    issn = {0176-1617},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176161715001923},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jplph.2015.07.011},
    abstract = {We examined the functioning of the antioxidative defense system in Arabidopsis thaliana under sulphur (S) deficiency with an emphasis on the role of mitochondria. In tissue extracts and in isolated mitochondria from S-deficient plants, the concentration of non-protein thiols declined but protein thiols did not change. Superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide were accumulated in leaf blades and the generation of superoxide anion by isolated mitochondria was higher. Lower abundance of reduced (GSH) plus oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in the leaf and root tissues, and leaf mitochondria from S-deficient plants was accompanied by a decrease in the level of GSH and the changes in the GSH/GSSG ratios. In the chloroplasts, the total level of glutathione decreased. Lower levels of reduced (AsA) and oxidized (DHA) ascorbate were reflected in much higher ratios of AsA/DHA. Sulphur deficiency led to an increase in the activity of cytosolic, mitochondrial and chloroplastic antioxidative enzymes, peroxidases, catalases and superoxide dismutases. The protein carbonyl level was higher in the leaves of S-deficient plants and in the chloroplasts, while in the roots, leaf and root mitochondria it remained unchanged. Protease activity in leaf extracts of S-deficient plants was higher, but in root extracts it did not differ. The proteolytic system reflected subcellular specificity. In leaf and root mitochondria the protease activity was higher, whereas in the chloroplasts it did not change. We propose that the preferential incorporation of S to protein thiols and activation of antioxidative and proteolytic systems are likely important for the survival of S-deficient plants and that the mitochondria maintain redox homeostasis.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Plant Physiology},
    author = {Ostaszewska-Bugajska, Monika and Rychter, Anna M. and Juszczuk, Izabela M.},
    month = aug,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Antioxidant defense, mitochondria, Protein carbonyls, reactive oxygen species, Sulphur deficiency, Thiols},
    pages = {25--38},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/TW2GX3XN/Ostaszewska-Bugajska et al. - 2015 - Antioxidative and proteolytic systems protect mito.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/39UUWB2R/S0176161715001923.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] J. Mogami, Y. Fujita, T. Yoshida, Y. Tsukiori, H. Nakagami, Y. Nomura, T. Fujiwara, S. Nishida, S. Yanagisawa, T. Ishida, F. Takahashi, K. Morimoto, S. Kidokoro, J. Mizoi, K. Shinozaki, and K. Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, “Two Distinct Families of Protein Kinases Are Required for Plant Growth under High External Mg2+ Concentrations in Arabidopsis,” Plant physiology, vol. 167, iss. 3, pp. 1039-1057, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mogami_two_2015,
    title = {Two {Distinct} {Families} of {Protein} {Kinases} {Are} {Required} for {Plant} {Growth} under {High} {External} {Mg}2+ {Concentrations} in {Arabidopsis}},
    volume = {167},
    issn = {, 1532-2548},
    url = {http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/167/3/1039},
    doi = {10.1104/pp.114.249870},
    abstract = {Protein phosphorylation events play key roles in maintaining cellular ion homeostasis in higher plants, and the regulatory roles of these events in Na+ and K+ transport have been studied extensively. However, the regulatory mechanisms governing Mg2+ transport and homeostasis in higher plants remain poorly understood, despite the vital roles of Mg2+ in cellular function. A member of subclass III sucrose nonfermenting-1-related protein kinase2 (SnRK2), SRK2D/SnRK2.2, functions as a key positive regulator of abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated signaling in response to water deficit stresses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we used immunoprecipitation coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses to identify Calcineurin B-like-interacting protein kinase26 (CIPK26) as a novel protein that physically interacts with SRK2D. In addition to CIPK26, three additional CIPKs (CIPK3, CIPK9, and CIPK23) can physically interact with SRK2D in planta. The srk2d/e/i triple mutant lacking all three members of subclass III SnRK2 and the cipk26/3/9/23 quadruple mutant lacking CIPK26, CIPK3, CIPK9, and CIPK23 showed reduced shoot growth under high external Mg2+ concentrations. Similarly, several ABA biosynthesis-deficient mutants, including aba2-1, were susceptible to high external Mg2+ concentrations. Taken together, our findings provided genetic evidence that SRK2D/E/I and CIPK26/3/9/23 are required for plant growth under high external Mg2+ concentrations in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we showed that ABA, a key molecule in water deficit stress signaling, also serves as a signaling molecule in plant growth under high external Mg2+ concentrations. These results suggested that SRK2D/E/I- and CIPK26/3/9/23-mediated phosphorylation signaling pathways maintain cellular Mg2+ homeostasis.},
    language = {en},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Physiology},
    author = {Mogami, Junro and Fujita, Yasunari and Yoshida, Takuya and Tsukiori, Yoshifumi and Nakagami, Hirofumi and Nomura, Yuko and Fujiwara, Toru and Nishida, Sho and Yanagisawa, Shuichi and Ishida, Tetsuya and Takahashi, Fuminori and Morimoto, Kyoko and Kidokoro, Satoshi and Mizoi, Junya and Shinozaki, Kazuo and Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko},
    month = mar,
    year = {2015},
    pmid = {25614064},
    pages = {1039--1057},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/BBDSWBXA/Mogami et al. - 2015 - Two Distinct Families of Protein Kinases Are Requi.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/SK82DSW9/1039.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. D. Planes, R. Niñoles, L. Rubio, G. Bissoli, E. Bueso, M. J. García-Sánchez, S. Alejandro, M. Gonzalez-Guzmán, R. Hedrich, P. L. Rodriguez, J. A. Fernández, and R. Serrano, “A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid in germinating seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana based on inhibition of plasma membrane H+-ATPase and decreased cytosolic pH, K+, and anions,” Journal of experimental botany, vol. 66, iss. 3, pp. 813-825, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{planes_mechanism_2015,
    title = {A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid in germinating seeds of {Arabidopsis} thaliana based on inhibition of plasma membrane {H}+-{ATPase} and decreased cytosolic {pH}, {K}+, and anions},
    volume = {66},
    issn = {0022-0957},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/66/3/813/479401/A-mechanism-of-growth-inhibition-by-abscisic-acid},
    doi = {10.1093/jxb/eru442},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
    author = {Planes, María D. and Niñoles, Regina and Rubio, Lourdes and Bissoli, Gaetano and Bueso, Eduardo and García-Sánchez, María J. and Alejandro, Santiago and Gonzalez-Guzmán, Miguel and Hedrich, Rainer and Rodriguez, Pedro L. and Fernández, José A. and Serrano, Ramón},
    month = feb,
    year = {2015},
    pages = {813--825},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/246F24ID/Planes et al. - 2015 - A mechanism of growth inhibition by abscisic acid .pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/5BW7AET8/A-mechanism-of-growth-inhibition-by-abscisic-acid.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] D. Jiménez-Arias, J. A. Pérez, J. C. Luis, V. Martín-Rodríguez, F. Valdés-González, and A. A. Borges, “Treating seeds in menadione sodium bisulphite primes salt tolerance in Arabidopsis by inducing an earlier plant adaptation,” Environmental and experimental botany, vol. 109, pp. 23-30, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{jimenez-arias_treating_2015,
    title = {Treating seeds in menadione sodium bisulphite primes salt tolerance in {Arabidopsis} by inducing an earlier plant adaptation},
    volume = {109},
    issn = {0098-8472},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847214001981},
    doi = {10.1016/j.envexpbot.2014.07.017},
    abstract = {For the majority of crops, salinity is one of the most important abiotic stresses, since about 20\% of irrigated agricultural land is adversely affected by it. Menadione sodium bisulphite (MSB), a water-soluble vitamin K3 o menadione derivative, has been previously reported as a plant defence activator against several pathogens in a number of species. We have further explored the MSB effects on salt tolerance. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana wild ecotype Col-0 plants were exposed to prolonged salt (50 mM) stress. Salt treatment resulted in severe growth inhibition. This detrimental effect was lower in terms of relative growth rate (RGR) in plants from seeds soaked in 20 mM of MSB. In these plants, the drop in RGR was nearly 30\% lower than untreated plants after 7 days in salt. Furthermore, we found that the salt stress imposed was not enough to disturb photosystem II or induce the expression of several detoxification genes. These functional impairments are characteristic of ionic injuries due to high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At the end of the second week of the experiment, salt-treated plants recover RGR levels close to those of the control. Under our experimental conditions plants seem to be challenged by an osmotic stress with a minimum ionic imbalance. Those from MSB-treated seeds were primed to induce an earlier proline accumulation. Although no significant expression of ROS detoxification genes was found, several transcription factors involved in ROS signalling were detected after salt addition. In this context, MSB treatment was able to prime these transcription factors, resulting in an early adaptation of plants in response to salt stress.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental and Experimental Botany},
    author = {Jiménez-Arias, David and Pérez, José A. and Luis, Juan C. and Martín-Rodríguez, Vanesa and Valdés-González, Francisco and Borges, Andrés A.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {abiotic stress, Priming, Proline accumulation, Salt stress, Soaking seeds},
    pages = {23--30},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/PB96Q4TP/Jiménez-Arias et al. - 2015 - Treating seeds in menadione sodium bisulphite prim.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/4IFJWZRV/S0098847214001981.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] Y. Koo, J. Wang, Q. Zhang, H. Zhu, W. E. Chehab, V. L. Colvin, P. J. J. Alvarez, and J. Braam, “Fluorescence Reports Intact Quantum Dot Uptake into Roots and Translocation to Leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana and Subsequent Ingestion by Insect Herbivores,” Environmental science & technology, vol. 49, iss. 1, pp. 626-632, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{koo_fluorescence_2015,
    title = {Fluorescence {Reports} {Intact} {Quantum} {Dot} {Uptake} into {Roots} and {Translocation} to {Leaves} of {Arabidopsis} thaliana and {Subsequent} {Ingestion} by {Insect} {Herbivores}},
    volume = {49},
    issn = {0013-936X},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es5050562},
    doi = {10.1021/es5050562},
    abstract = {We explored the impact of quantum dot (QD) coat characteristics on NP stability, uptake, and translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana, and subsequent transfer to primary consumers, Trichoplusia ni (T. ni). Arabidopsis was exposed to CdSe/CdZnS QDs with three different coatings: Poly(acrylic acid-ethylene glycol) (PAA-EG), polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PMAO–PEG), which are anionic, cationic, and relatively neutral, respectively. PAA-EG-coated QDs were relatively stable and taken up from a hydroponic medium through both Arabidopsis leaf petioles and roots, without apparent aggregation, and showed generally uniform distribution in leaves. In contrast, PEI- and PMAO–PEG-coated QDs displayed destabilization in the hydroponic medium, and generated particulate fluorescence plant tissues, suggesting aggregation. PAA-EG QDs moved faster than PEI QDs through leaf petioles; however, 8-fold more cadmium accumulated in PEI QD-treated leaves than in those exposed to PAA-EG QDs, possibly due to PEI QD dissolution and direct metal uptake. T. ni caterpillars that fed on Arabidopsis exposed to QDs had reduced performance, and QD fluorescence was detected in both T. ni bodies and frass, demonstrating trophic transfer of intact QDs from plants to insects. Overall, this paper demonstrates that QD coat properties influence plant nanoparticle uptake and translocation and can impact transfer to herbivores.},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental Science \& Technology},
    author = {Koo, Yeonjong and Wang, Jing and Zhang, Qingbo and Zhu, Huiguang and Chehab, E. Wassim and Colvin, Vicki L. and Alvarez, Pedro J. J. and Braam, Janet},
    month = jan,
    year = {2015},
    pages = {626--632},
    file = {ACS Full Text PDF w/ Links:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/93RRZK5U/Koo et al. - 2015 - Fluorescence Reports Intact Quantum Dot Uptake int.pdf:application/pdf;ACS Full Text Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/7SNI727N/es5050562.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. Podgórska, M. Ostaszewska, P. Gardeström, A. G. Rasmusson, and B. Szal, “In comparison with nitrate nutrition, ammonium nutrition increases growth of the frostbite1 Arabidopsis mutant,” Plant, cell & environment, vol. 38, iss. 1, pp. 224-237, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{podgorska_comparison_2015,
    title = {In comparison with nitrate nutrition, ammonium nutrition increases growth of the frostbite1 {Arabidopsis} mutant},
    volume = {38},
    issn = {1365-3040},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pce.12404/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/pce.12404},
    abstract = {Ammonium nutrition inhibits the growth of many plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana. The toxicity of ammonium is associated with changes in the cellular redox state. The cellular oxidant/antioxidant balance is controlled by mitochondrial electron transport chain. In this study, we analysed the redox metabolism of frostbite1 (fro1) plants, which lack mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I. Surprisingly, the growth of fro1 plants increased under ammonium nutrition. Ammonium nutrition increased the reduction level of pyridine nucleotides in the leaves of wild-type plants, but not in the leaves of fro1 mutant plants. The observed higher activities of type II NADH dehydrogenases and cytochrome c oxidase in the mitochondrial electron transport chain may improve the energy metabolism of fro1 plants grown on ammonium. Additionally, the observed changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism in the apoplast may be important for determining the growth of fro1 under ammonium nutrition. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses showed that the gene expression changes in fro1 plants significantly overlap with the changes previously observed in plants with a modified apoplastic pH. Overall, the results suggest a pronounced connection between the mitochondrial redox system and the apoplastic pH and ROS levels, which may modify cell wall plasticity and influence growth.},
    language = {en},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant, Cell \& Environment},
    author = {Podgórska, Anna and Ostaszewska, Monika and Gardeström, Per and Rasmusson, Allan G. and Szal, Bożena},
    month = jan,
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {ammonium syndrome, apoplast, apoplastic pH, complex I, dysfunction of mtETC, mitochondria, redox homeostasis, respiration},
    pages = {224--237},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/6EIVHSAF/Podgórska et al. - 2015 - In comparison with nitrate nutrition, ammonium nut.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/UJBACGCI/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Landa, S. Prerostova, S. Petrova, V. Knirsch, R. Vankova, and T. Vanek, “The Transcriptomic Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Zinc Oxide: A Comparison of the Impact of Nanoparticle, Bulk, and Ionic Zinc,” Environmental science & technology, vol. 49, iss. 24, pp. 14537-14545, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{landa_transcriptomic_2015,
    title = {The {Transcriptomic} {Response} of {Arabidopsis} thaliana to {Zinc} {Oxide}: {A} {Comparison} of the {Impact} of {Nanoparticle}, {Bulk}, and {Ionic} {Zinc}},
    volume = {49},
    issn = {0013-936X},
    shorttitle = {The {Transcriptomic} {Response} of {Arabidopsis} thaliana to {Zinc} {Oxide}},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b03330},
    doi = {10.1021/acs.est.5b03330},
    abstract = {The impact of nanosize was evaluated by comparing of the transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana roots to ZnO nanoparticles (nZnO), bulk ZnO, and ionic Zn2+. Microarray analyses revealed 416 up- and 961 down-regulated transcripts (expression difference {\textgreater}2-fold, p [FDR] {\textless} 0.01) after a seven-day treatment with nZnO (average particle size 20 nm, concentration 4 mg L–1). Exposure to bulk ZnO resulted in 816 up- and 2179 down-regulated transcripts. The most dramatic changes (1711 transcripts up- and 3242 down-regulated) were caused by the presence of ionic Zn2+ (applied as ZnSO4.7H20 at a concentration of 14.14 mg L–1, corresponding to the amount of Zn contained in 4 mg L–1 ZnO). Genes involved in stress response (e.g., to salt, osmotic stress or water deprivation) were the most relatively abundant group of gene transcripts up-regulated by all three Zn treatments while genes involved in cell organization and biogenesis (e.g., tubulins, arabinogalactan proteins) and DNA or RNA metabolism (e.g., histones) were the most relatively abundant groups of down-regulated transcripts. The similarity of the transcription profiles and the increasing number of changed transcripts correlating with the increased concentration of Zn2+ in cultivation medium indicated that released Zn2+ may substantially contribute to the toxic effect of nZnO because particle size has not demonstrated a decisive role.},
    number = {24},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental Science \& Technology},
    author = {Landa, Premysl and Prerostova, Sylva and Petrova, Sarka and Knirsch, Vojtech and Vankova, Radomira and Vanek, Tomas},
    month = dec,
    year = {2015},
    pages = {14537--14545},
    file = {ACS Full Text PDF w/ Links:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/HCG687H5/Landa et al. - 2015 - The Transcriptomic Response of Arabidopsis thalian.pdf:application/pdf;ACS Full Text Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/7TEE3M29/acs.est.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] L. Mathieu, G. Lobet, P. Tocquin, and C. Périlleux, ““Rhizoponics”: a novel hydroponic rhizotron for root system analyses on mature Arabidopsis thaliana plants,” Plant methods, vol. 11, p. 3, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mathieu_rhizoponics:_2015,
    title = {“{Rhizoponics}”: a novel hydroponic rhizotron for root system analyses on mature {Arabidopsis} thaliana plants},
    volume = {11},
    issn = {1746-4811},
    shorttitle = {“{Rhizoponics}”},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13007-015-0046-x},
    doi = {10.1186/s13007-015-0046-x},
    abstract = {Well-developed and functional roots are critical to support plant life and reach high crop yields. Their study however, is hampered by their underground growth and characterizing complex root system architecture (RSA) therefore remains a challenge. In the last few years, several phenotyping methods, including rhizotrons and x-ray computed tomography, have been developed for relatively thick roots. But in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in vitro culture remains the easiest and preferred method to study root development, which technically limits the analyses to young seedlings.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Methods},
    author = {Mathieu, Laura and Lobet, Guillaume and Tocquin, Pierre and Périlleux, Claire},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis},
    pages = {3},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/2NNKIW7W/Mathieu et al. - 2015 - “Rhizoponics” a novel hydroponic rhizotron for ro.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/HKFSAPT4/s13007-015-0046-x.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] J. Lallemand, F. Bouché, C. Desiron, J. Stautemas, F. de Lemos Esteves, C. Périlleux, and P. Tocquin, “Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots,” Frontiers in plant science, vol. 6, 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{lallemand_extracellular_2015,
    title = {Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots},
    volume = {6},
    issn = {1664-462X},
    url = {http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2015.00037/abstract},
    doi = {10.3389/fpls.2015.00037},
    abstract = {Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion), in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes) were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs). Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing.},
    language = {English},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Frontiers in Plant Science},
    author = {Lallemand, Jérôme and Bouché, Frédéric and Desiron, Carole and Stautemas, Jennifer and de Lemos Esteves, Frédéric and Périlleux, Claire and Tocquin, Pierre},
    year = {2015},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, in silico analysis, Molecular pharming, Nicotiana tabacum, peptidases, Root secretion, Suspension cells},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CUF3GIEG/Lallemand et al. - 2015 - Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
  • [DOI] N. Strehmel, C. Böttcher, S. Schmidt, and D. Scheel, “Profiling of secondary metabolites in root exudates of Arabidopsis thaliana,” Phytochemistry, vol. 108, pp. 35-46, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{strehmel_profiling_2014,
    title = {Profiling of secondary metabolites in root exudates of {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {108},
    issn = {0031-9422},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0031942214004075},
    doi = {10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.10.003},
    abstract = {To explore the chemical composition of root exudates of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana a workflow for nontargeted metabolite profiling of the semipolar fraction of root exudates was developed. It comprises hydroponic plant cultivation and sampling of root exudates under sterile conditions, sample preparation by solid-phase extraction and analysis by reversed-phase UPLC/ESI-QTOFMS. Following the established workflow, root exudates of six-week-old plants were profiled and a set of reproducibly occurring molecular features was compiled. To structurally elucidate the corresponding metabolites, accurate mass tandem mass spectrometry and on-line hydrogen/deuterium exchange were applied. Currently, a total of 103 compounds were detected and annotated by elemental composition of which more than 90 were structurally characterized or classified. Among them, 42 compounds were rigorously identified using an authenticated standard. The compounds identified so far include nucleosides, deoxynucleosides, aromatic amino acids, anabolites and catabolites of glucosinolates, dipeptides, indolics, salicylic and jasmonic acid catabolites, coumarins, mono-, di- and trilignols, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and oxylipins and exemplify the high chemical diversity of plant root exudates.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Phytochemistry},
    author = {Strehmel, Nadine and Böttcher, Christoph and Schmidt, Stephan and Scheel, Dierk},
    month = dec,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassicaceae, LC/MS, Metabolite profiling, Root exudates, Secondary metabolism, Structure elucidation},
    pages = {35--46},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/2QQ383ZF/Strehmel et al. - 2014 - Profiling of secondary metabolites in root exudate.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CQXSX8BV/S0031942214004075.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Kalhorzadeh, Z. Hu, T. Cools, S. Amiard, E. Willing, N. D. Winne, K. Gevaert, G. D. Jaeger, K. Schneeberger, C. I. White, and L. D. Veylder, “Arabidopsis thaliana RNase H2 Deficiency Counteracts the Needs for the WEE1 Checkpoint Kinase but Triggers Genome Instability,” The plant cell, vol. 26, iss. 9, pp. 3680-3692, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{kalhorzadeh_arabidopsis_2014,
    title = {Arabidopsis thaliana {RNase} {H}2 {Deficiency} {Counteracts} the {Needs} for the {WEE}1 {Checkpoint} {Kinase} but {Triggers} {Genome} {Instability}},
    volume = {26},
    issn = {, 1532-298X},
    url = {http://www.plantcell.org/content/26/9/3680},
    doi = {10.1105/tpc.114.128108},
    abstract = {The WEE1 kinase is an essential cell cycle checkpoint regulator in Arabidopsis thaliana plants experiencing replication defects. Whereas under non-stress conditions WEE1-deficient plants develop normally, they fail to adapt to replication inhibitory conditions, resulting in the accumulation of DNA damage and loss of cell division competence. We identified mutant alleles of the genes encoding subunits of the ribonuclease H2 (RNase H2) complex, known for its role in removing ribonucleotides from DNA-RNA duplexes, as suppressor mutants of WEE1 knockout plants. RNase H2 deficiency triggered an increase in homologous recombination (HR), correlated with the accumulation of γ-H2AX foci. However, as HR negatively impacts the growth of WEE1-deficient plants under replication stress, it cannot account for the rescue of the replication defects of the WEE1 knockout plants. Rather, the observed increase in ribonucleotide incorporation in DNA indicates that the substitution of deoxynucleotide with ribonucleotide abolishes the need for WEE1 under replication stress. Strikingly, increased ribonucleotide incorporation in DNA correlated with the occurrence of small base pair deletions, identifying the RNase H2 complex as an important suppressor of genome instability.},
    language = {en},
    number = {9},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {The Plant Cell},
    author = {Kalhorzadeh, Pooneh and Hu, Zhubing and Cools, Toon and Amiard, Simon and Willing, Eva-Maria and Winne, Nancy De and Gevaert, Kris and Jaeger, Geert De and Schneeberger, Korbinian and White, Charles I. and Veylder, Lieven De},
    month = sep,
    year = {2014},
    pmid = {25217508},
    pages = {3680--3692},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/D6BGSV36/Kalhorzadeh et al. - 2014 - Arabidopsis thaliana RNase H2 Deficiency Counterac.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/VH7C78B7/3680.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Koen, P. Trapet, D. Brulé, A. Kulik, A. Klinguer, L. Atauri-Miranda, R. Meunier-Prest, G. Boni, G. Glauser, B. Mauch-Mani, D. Wendehenne, and A. Besson-Bard, “Β-Aminobutyric Acid (BABA)-Induced Resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana: Link with Iron Homeostasis,” Molecular plant-microbe interactions, vol. 27, iss. 11, pp. 1226-1240, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{koen_-aminobutyric_2014,
    title = {β-{Aminobutyric} {Acid} ({BABA})-{Induced} {Resistance} in {Arabidopsis} thaliana: {Link} with {Iron} {Homeostasis}},
    volume = {27},
    issn = {0894-0282},
    shorttitle = {β-{Aminobutyric} {Acid} ({BABA})-{Induced} {Resistance} in {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    url = {http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/MPMI-05-14-0142-R},
    doi = {10.1094/MPMI-05-14-0142-R},
    abstract = {β-Aminobutyric acid (BABA) is a nonprotein amino acid inducing resistance in many different plant species against a wide range of abiotic and biotic stresses. Nevertheless, how BABA primes plant natural defense reactions remains poorly understood. Based on its structure, we hypothesized and confirmed that BABA is able to chelate iron (Fe) in vitro. In vivo, we showed that it led to a transient Fe deficiency response in Arabidopsis thaliana plants exemplified by a reduction of ferritin accumulation and disturbances in the expression of genes related to Fe homeostasis. This response was not correlated to changes in Fe concentrations, suggesting that BABA affects the availability or the distribution of Fe rather than its assimilation. The phenotype of BABA-treated plants was similar to those of plants cultivated in Fe-deficient conditions. A metabolomic analysis indicated that both BABA and Fe deficiency induced the accumulation of common metabolites, including p-coumaroylagmatine, a metabolite previously shown to be synthesized in several plant species facing pathogen attack. Finally, we showed that the protective effect induced by BABA against Botrytis cinerea was mimicked by Fe deficiency. In conclusion, the Fe deficiency response caused by BABA could bring the plant to a defense-ready state, participating in the plant resistance against the pathogens.},
    number = {11},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions},
    author = {Koen, Emmanuel and Trapet, Pauline and Brulé, Daphnée and Kulik, Anna and Klinguer, Agnès and Atauri-Miranda, Livia and Meunier-Prest, Rita and Boni, Gilles and Glauser, Gaétan and Mauch-Mani, Brigitte and Wendehenne, David and Besson-Bard, Angélique},
    month = jul,
    year = {2014},
    pages = {1226--1240},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CVWH8P9D/Koen et al. - 2014 - β-Aminobutyric Acid (BABA)-Induced Resistance in A.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/5AVWII7Q/MPMI-05-14-0142-R.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Ostaszewska, I. M. Juszczuk, I. Kołodziejek, and A. M. Rychter, “Long-term sulphur starvation of Arabidopsis thaliana modifies mitochondrial ultrastructure and activity and changes tissue energy and redox status,” Journal of plant physiology, vol. 171, iss. 7, pp. 549-558, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{ostaszewska_long-term_2014,
    title = {Long-term sulphur starvation of {Arabidopsis} thaliana modifies mitochondrial ultrastructure and activity and changes tissue energy and redox status},
    volume = {171},
    issn = {0176-1617},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176161713004872},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jplph.2013.12.013},
    abstract = {Summary
    Sulphur, as a constituent of amino acids (cysteine and methionine), iron–sulphur clusters, proteins, membrane sulpholipids, glutathione, glucosinolates, coenzymes, and auxin precursors, is essential for plant growth and development. Absence or low sulphur concentration in the soil results in severe growth retardation. Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown hydroponically for nine weeks on Knop nutrient medium without sulphur showed morphological symptoms of sulphur deficiency. The purpose of our study was to investigate changes that mitochondria undergo and the role of the highly branched respiratory chain in survival during sulphur deficiency stress. Ultrastructure analysis of leaf mesophyll cells of sulphur-deficient Arabidopsis showed heterogeneity of mitochondria; some of them were not altered, but the majority had swollen morphology. Dilated mitochondria displayed a lower matrix density and fewer cristae compared to control mitochondria. Disintegration of the inner and outer membranes of some mitochondria from the leaves of sulphur-deficient plants was observed. On the contrary, chloroplast ultrastructure was not affected. Sulphur deficiency changed the respiratory activity of tissues and isolated mitochondria; Complex I and IV capacities and phosphorylation rates were lower, but external NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity increased. Higher external NAD(P)H dehydrogenase activity corresponded to increased cell redox level with doubled NADH/NAD ratio in the leaf and root tissues. Sulphur deficiency modified energy status in the tissues of Arabidopsis plants. The total concentration of adenylates (expressed as ATP + ADP), measured in the light, was lower in the leaves and roots of sulphur-deficient plants than in the controls, which was mainly due to the severely decreased ATP levels. We show that the changes in mitochondrial ultrastructure are compensated by the modifications in respiratory chain activity. Although mitochondria of Arabidopsis tissues are affected by sulphur deficiency, their metabolic and structural features, which readily reach new homeostasis, make these organelles crucial for adaptation of plants to survive sulphur deficiency.},
    number = {7},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Plant Physiology},
    author = {Ostaszewska, Monika and Juszczuk, Izabela M. and Kołodziejek, Izabella and Rychter, Anna M.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Energy status, Mitochondria ultrastructure, redox homeostasis, respiration, Sulphur deficiency},
    pages = {549--558},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/DIAKZEKA/Ostaszewska et al. - 2014 - Long-term sulphur starvation of Arabidopsis thalia.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/MAZSMBAC/S0176161713004872.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] I. Aranjuelo, F. Doustaly, J. Cela, R. Porcel, M. Müller, R. Aroca, S. Munné-Bosch, and J. Bourguignon, “Glutathione and transpiration as key factors conditioning oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to uranium,” Planta, vol. 239, iss. 4, pp. 817-830, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{aranjuelo_glutathione_2014,
    title = {Glutathione and transpiration as key factors conditioning oxidative stress in {Arabidopsis} thaliana exposed to uranium},
    volume = {239},
    issn = {0032-0935, 1432-2048},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00425-013-2014-x},
    doi = {10.1007/s00425-013-2014-x},
    abstract = {Although oxidative stress has been previously described in plants exposed to uranium (U), some uncertainty remains about the role of glutathione and tocopherol availability in the different responsiveness of plants to photo-oxidative damage. Moreover, in most cases, little consideration is given to the role of water transport in shoot heavy metal accumulation. Here, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate exposure (50 μM) on PSII and parameters involved in water transport (leaf transpiration and aquaporin gene expression) of Arabidopsis wild type (WT) and mutant plants that are deficient in tocopherol (vte1: null α/γ-tocopherol and vte4: null α-tocopherol) and glutathione biosynthesis (high content: cad1.3 and low content: cad2.1). We show how U exposure induced photosynthetic inhibition that entailed an electron sink/source imbalance that caused PSII photoinhibition in the mutants. The WT was the only line where U did not damage PSII. The increase in energy thermal dissipation observed in all the plants exposed to U did not avoid photo-oxidative damage of mutants. The maintenance of control of glutathione and malondialdehyde contents probed to be target points for the overcoming of photoinhibition in the WT. The relationship between leaf U content and leaf transpiration confirmed the relevance of water transport in heavy metals partitioning and accumulation in leaves, with the consequent implication of susceptibility to oxidative stress.},
    language = {en},
    number = {4},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Planta},
    author = {Aranjuelo, Iker and Doustaly, Fany and Cela, Jana and Porcel, Rosa and Müller, Maren and Aroca, Ricardo and Munné-Bosch, Sergi and Bourguignon, Jacques},
    month = apr,
    year = {2014},
    pages = {817--830},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/K5HG3EH6/Aranjuelo et al. - 2014 - Glutathione and transpiration as key factors condi.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/A4H7DEJS/s00425-013-2014-x.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] B. M. Montero-Palmero, A. Martín-Barranco, C. Escobar, and L. E. Hernández, “Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress,” New phytologist, vol. 201, iss. 1, pp. 116-130, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{montero-palmero_early_2014,
    title = {Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress},
    volume = {201},
    issn = {1469-8137},
    shorttitle = {Early transcriptional responses to mercury},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nph.12486/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/nph.12486},
    abstract = {* Understanding the cellular mechanisms of plant tolerance to mercury (Hg) is important for developing phytoremediation strategies of Hg-contaminated soils. The early responses of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings to Hg were studied using transcriptomics analysis.
    * A Medicago truncatula microarray was hybridized with high-quality root RNA from M. sativa treated with 3 μM Hg for 3, 6 and 24 h. The transcriptional pattern data were complementary to the measurements of root growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and NADPH-oxidase activity as stress indexes.
    * Of 559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 91\% were up-regulated. The majority of DEGs were shared between the 3 and 6 h (60\%) time points, including the ‘stress’, ‘secondary metabolism’ and ‘hormone metabolism’ functional categories. Genes from ethylene metabolism and signalling were highly represented, suggesting that this phytohormone may be relevant for metal perception and homeostasis.
    * Ethylene-insensitive alfalfa seedlings preincubated with the ethylene signalling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopronene and Arabidopsis thaliana ein2-5 mutants confirmed that ethylene participates in the early perception of Hg stress. It modulates root growth inhibition, NADPH-oxidase activity and Hg-induced apoplastic H2O2 accumulation. Therefore, ethylene signalling attenuation could be useful in future phytotechnological applications to ameliorate stress symptoms in Hg-polluted plants.},
    language = {en},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {New Phytologist},
    author = {Montero-Palmero, M. Belén and Martín-Barranco, Amanda and Escobar, Carolina and Hernández, Luis E.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), Arabidopsis thaliana, ethylene, ethylene insensitive2-5, Medicago sativa (alfalfa), mercury (Hg), oxidative stress, transcriptome},
    pages = {116--130},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/4T73IHW9/Montero-Palmero et al. - 2014 - Early transcriptional responses to mercury a role.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/8XEFI42V/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] J. Sobrino-Plata, D. Meyssen, A. Cuypers, C. Escobar, and L. E. Hernández, “Glutathione is a key antioxidant metabolite to cope with mercury and cadmium stress,” Plant and soil, vol. 377, iss. 1-2, pp. 369-381, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{sobrino-plata_glutathione_2014,
    title = {Glutathione is a key antioxidant metabolite to cope with mercury and cadmium stress},
    volume = {377},
    issn = {0032-079X, 1573-5036},
    url = {https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-013-2006-4},
    doi = {10.1007/s11104-013-2006-4},
    abstract = {BackgroundGlutathione (GSH) plays a dual role under heavy metal stress, as antioxidant metabolite and as precursor of phytochelatins (PCs). Studying the responses of the GSH metabolism to heavy metals is important to improve tolerance.MethodsWe studied the oxidative stress signature of three γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γECS) Arabidopsis thaliana allele mutants (rax1-1, cad2-1, and pad2-1), first enzymatic step in the GSH synthetic pathway, when treated with 10 μM Cd or Hg for 72 h.ResultsGSH concentration was lower in the mutants (45 \% rax1-1; 30 \% cad2-1; and 20 \% pad2-1), which was also associated with inferior translocation of Cd or Hg to shoots, than in wild type Col-0. Glutathione reductase (GR) and NADPH-oxidase activities were inhibited in roots, phytotoxic effects consistently more pronounced in the mutants, particularly in pad2-1. Non-photochemical quenching augmented with exposure time to Cd or Hg in Col-0, but not so in the γECS mutants. Mercury caused severe damage in cad2-1 and pad2-1 root proteins profile; toxic effects confirmed by GR and H+-ATPase immunodetection. PCs appeared in Col-0 roots under metal stress, and surprisingly accumulated in rax1-1. γECS immunodetection revealed its overexpression in rax1-1.ConclusionA minimum amount of GSH may be required for adequate metal tolerance, where γECS expression could compensate GSH deficiency under stress.},
    language = {en},
    number = {1-2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant and Soil},
    author = {Sobrino-Plata, Juan and Meyssen, Dirk and Cuypers, Ann and Escobar, Carolina and Hernández, Luis E.},
    month = apr,
    year = {2014},
    pages = {369--381},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/GNUWVUJU/Sobrino-Plata et al. - 2014 - Glutathione is a key antioxidant metabolite to cop.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/7GHW5EKD/s11104-013-2006-4.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. Fatangare, P. Gebhardt, H. Saluz, and A. Svatoš, “Comparing 2-[18f]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and [68ga]gallium-citrate translocation in Arabidopsis thaliana,” Nuclear medicine and biology, vol. 41, iss. 9, pp. 737-743, 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{fatangare_comparing_2014,
    title = {Comparing 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-{D}-glucose and [68Ga]gallium-citrate translocation in {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {41},
    issn = {0969-8051},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969805114004259},
    doi = {10.1016/j.nucmedbio.2014.05.143},
    abstract = {2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) is a glucose surrogate commonly used in clinical or animal imaging but rarely in plant imaging to trace glucose metabolism. Recently, 18FDG has been employed in plant imaging for studying photoassimilate translocation and glycoside biosynthesis. There is growing evidence that 18FDG could be used as a tracer in plant imaging studies to trace sugar dynamics. However, to confirm this hypothesis, it was necessary to show that the observed 18FDG distribution in an intact plant is an outcome of the chemical nature of the introduced radiotracer and not of the plant vascular architecture or radiotracer introduction method.
    Methods
    In the present work, we fed 18FDG and [68Ga]gallium-citrate (68Ga-citrate) solution through mature Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and monitored subsequent radioactivity distribution using positron autoradiography. The possible route of radioactivity translocation was elucidated through stem-girdling experiments. We also employed a bi-functional positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) modality to capture 18FDG radiotracer dynamics in one of the plants in order to assess applicability of PET/CT for 4-D imaging in an intact plant.
    Results
    Autoradiography results showed that [18F] radioactivity accumulated mostly in roots and young growing parts such as the shoot apex, which are known to act as sinks for photoassimilate. [18F] radioactivity translocation, in this case, occurred mainly via phloem. PET/CT results corroborated with autoradiography. [68Ga] radioactivity, on the other hand, was mainly translocated to neighboring leaves and its translocation occurred via both xylem and phloem.
    Conclusion
    The radioactivity distribution pattern and translocation route observed after 18FDG feeding is markedly different from that of 68Ga-citrate. [18F] radioactivity distribution pattern in an intact plant is found similar to the typical distribution pattern of photoassimilates. Despite its limitations in quantification and resolution, PET/CT could be a useful tool to elucidate in vivo dynamics of [18F] radioactivity in intact plants.},
    number = {9},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Nuclear Medicine and Biology},
    author = {Fatangare, Amol and Gebhardt, Peter and Saluz, Hanspeter and Svatoš, Aleš},
    month = oct,
    year = {2014},
    keywords = {Imaging, PET/CT, Photoassimilate, Plant, Translocation},
    pages = {737--743},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/3C6KBQFN/Fatangare et al. - 2014 - Comparing 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose and [68G.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/C9SDEEKE/S0969805114004259.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Hsu and Y. Tsay, “Two Phloem Nitrate Transporters, NRT1.11 and NRT1.12, Are Important for Redistributing Xylem-Borne Nitrate to Enhance Plant Growth,” Plant physiology, vol. 163, iss. 2, pp. 844-856, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{hsu_two_2013,
    title = {Two {Phloem} {Nitrate} {Transporters}, {NRT}1.11 and {NRT}1.12, {Are} {Important} for {Redistributing} {Xylem}-{Borne} {Nitrate} to {Enhance} {Plant} {Growth}},
    volume = {163},
    issn = {, 1532-2548},
    url = {http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/163/2/844},
    doi = {10.1104/pp.113.226563},
    abstract = {This study of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) nitrate transporters NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 reveals how the interplay between xylem and phloem transport of nitrate ensures optimal nitrate distribution in leaves for plant growth. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that both NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are low-affinity nitrate transporters. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analysis showed higher expression of these two genes in larger expanded leaves. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are plasma membrane transporters expressed in the companion cells of the major vein. In nrt1.11 nrt1.12 double mutants, more root-fed 15NO3− was translocated to mature and larger expanded leaves but less to the youngest tissues, suggesting that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are required for transferring root-derived nitrate into phloem in the major veins of mature and larger expanded leaves for redistributing to the youngest tissues. Distinct from the wild type, nrt1.11 nrt1.12 double mutants show no increase of plant growth at high nitrate supply. These data suggested that NRT1.11 and NRT1.12 are involved in xylem-to-phloem transfer for redistributing nitrate into developing leaves, and such nitrate redistribution is a critical step for optimal plant growth enhanced by increasing external nitrate.},
    language = {en},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Physiology},
    author = {Hsu, Po-Kai and Tsay, Yi-Fang},
    month = oct,
    year = {2013},
    pmid = {24006285},
    pages = {844--856},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/IWKT63NZ/Hsu and Tsay - 2013 - Two Phloem Nitrate Transporters, NRT1.11 and NRT1..pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/S3JW5ZWX/844.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] Y. Liu and C. Sun, “Characterization of differential expression and leader intron function of Arabidopsis atTOC159 homologous genes by transgenic plants,” Botanical studies, vol. 54, iss. 1, p. 40, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{liu_characterization_2013,
    title = {Characterization of differential expression and leader intron function of {Arabidopsis} {atTOC}159 homologous genes by transgenic plants},
    volume = {54},
    copyright = {2013 Liu and Sun; licensee Springer.},
    issn = {1999-3110},
    url = {http://as-botanicalstudies.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/1999-3110-54-40},
    doi = {10.1186/1999-3110-54-40},
    abstract = {Accurate import of thousands of nuclear-encoded proteins is an important step in plastid biogenesis. However, the import machinery of cytosolic precursor proteins to plastids relies on the Toc and Tic (translocons on the outer envelope and inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts) complexes. Toc159 protein was identified in pea (Pisum sativum) as a major receptor for the precursor proteins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, four psToc159 homologs are identified, termed atToc159, atToc132, atToc120 and atToc90. The expression of these protein-encoding genes has to be properly regulated, because their gene products must be correctly integrated to appropriate apparatus to perform their functions. In order to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of atTOC159 homologous gene expression, transgenes containing various lengths of the upstream regulatory sequences of atTOC159/atTOC132/atTOC120/atTOC90 and GUS coding sequence were transferred to wild type Arabidopsis. In accordance with the analysis of GUS activity in these transgenic plants at various developmental stages, these homologous genes had distinct expression patterns. AtTOC159 and atTOC90 are preferentially expressed in above-ground tissues, such as cotyledons and leaves. In mature roots, atTOC159 and atTOC132 are expressed at higher levels, while atTOC120 and atTOC90 are expressed at the basal level. All four genes have increased expression level during flower and fruit development, particularly a remarkably high expression level of atTOC159 in later stage of fruit development. Furthermore, leader intron in the 5′ UTR induces the expression level of atTOC159 members in a tissue-specific manner. This is able to up-regulate the atTOC120 expression in roots/leaves/flowers, and the atTOC90 expression in cotyledons/leaves/anthers. The differential expression of atTOC159 gene members is essential during plastid development, because proper atToc159 isoforms are required to import distinct proteins to the plastids of different tissues.},
    language = {En},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Botanical Studies},
    author = {Liu, Yu-Shan and Sun, Chih-Wen},
    month = sep,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {40},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/WGZFIN64/Liu and Sun - 2013 - Characterization of differential expression and le.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/BRMM4V6Q/1999-3110-54-40.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. Wawrzyńska, A. Kurzyk, M. Mierzwińska, D. Płochocka, G. Wieczorek, and A. Sirko, “Direct targeting of Arabidopsis cysteine synthase complexes with synthetic polypeptides to selectively deregulate cysteine synthesis,” Plant science, vol. 207, pp. 148-157, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{wawrzynska_direct_2013,
    title = {Direct targeting of {Arabidopsis} cysteine synthase complexes with synthetic polypeptides to selectively deregulate cysteine synthesis},
    volume = {207},
    issn = {0168-9452},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168945213000472},
    doi = {10.1016/j.plantsci.2013.02.016},
    abstract = {Biosynthesis of cysteine is one of the fundamental processes in plants providing the reduced sulfur for cell metabolism. It is accomplished by the sequential action of two enzymes, serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL). Together they constitute the hetero-oligomeric cysteine synthase (CS) complex through specific protein–protein interactions influencing the rate of cysteine production. The aim of our studies was to deregulate the CS complex formation in order to investigate its function in the control of sulfur homeostasis and optimize cysteine synthesis. Computational modeling was used to build a model of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial CS complex. Several polypeptides based on OAS-TL C amino-acid sequence found at SAT-OASTL interaction sites were designed as probable competitors for SAT3 binding. After verification of the binding in a yeast two-hybrid assay, the most strongly interacting polypeptide was introduced to different cellular compartments of Arabidopsis cell via genetic transformation. Moderate increase in total SAT and OAS-TL activities, but not thiols content, was observed dependent on the transgenic line and sulfur availability in the hydroponic medium. Though our studies demonstrate the proof of principle, they also suggest more complex interaction of both enzymes underlying the mechanism of their reciprocal regulation.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Science},
    author = {Wawrzyńska, Anna and Kurzyk, Agata and Mierzwińska, Monika and Płochocka, Danuta and Wieczorek, Grzegorz and Sirko, Agnieszka},
    month = jun,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {Cysteine, Cysteine synthase complex, Protein–protein interaction, Serine acetyltransferase, Synthetic polypeptide},
    pages = {148--157},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/G9NHTXDB/Wawrzyńska et al. - 2013 - Direct targeting of Arabidopsis cysteine synthase .pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/STSZVW7P/S0168945213000472.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] F. McLoughlin, S. A. Arisz, H. L. Dekker, G. Kramer, C. G. de Koster, M. A. Haring, T. Munnik, and C. Testerink, “Identification of novel candidate phosphatidic acid-binding proteins involved in the salt-stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana roots,” Biochemical journal, vol. 450, iss. 3, pp. 573-581, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mcloughlin_identification_2013,
    title = {Identification of novel candidate phosphatidic acid-binding proteins involved in the salt-stress response of {Arabidopsis} thaliana roots},
    volume = {450},
    copyright = {© The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 Biochemical Society},
    issn = {0264-6021, 1470-8728},
    url = {http://www.biochemj.org/content/450/3/573},
    doi = {10.1042/BJ20121639},
    abstract = {PA (phosphatidic acid) is a lipid second messenger involved in an array of processes occurring during a plant's life cycle. These include development, metabolism, and both biotic and abiotic stress responses. PA levels increase in response to salt, but little is known about its function in the earliest responses to salt stress. In the present study we have combined an approach to isolate peripheral membrane proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana roots with lipid-affinity purification, to identify putative proteins that interact with PA and are recruited to the membrane in response to salt stress. Of the 42 putative PA-binding proteins identified by MS, a set of eight new candidate PA-binding proteins accumulated at the membrane fraction after 7 min of salt stress. Among these were CHC (clathrin heavy chain) isoforms, ANTH (AP180 N-terminal homology) domain clathrin-assembly proteins, a putative regulator of potassium transport, two ribosomal proteins, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and a PI (phosphatidylinositol) 4-kinase. PA binding and salt-induced membrane recruitment of GAPDH and CHC were confirmed by Western blot analysis of the cellular fractions. In conclusion, the approach of the present study is an effective way to isolate biologically relevant lipid-binding proteins and provides new leads in the study of PA-mediated salt-stress responses in roots.},
    language = {en},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Biochemical Journal},
    author = {McLoughlin, Fionn and Arisz, Steven A. and Dekker, Henk L. and Kramer, Gertjan and Koster, Chris G. de and Haring, Michel A. and Munnik, Teun and Testerink, Christa},
    month = mar,
    year = {2013},
    pmid = {23323832},
    pages = {573--581},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/JZU6ZAJP/McLoughlin et al. - 2013 - Identification of novel candidate phosphatidic aci.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/TBZX955P/573.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] H. Ellouzi, K. B. Hamed, J. Cela, M. Müller, C. Abdelly, and S. Munné-Bosch, “Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient Arabidopsis mutants growing in a hydroponic system,” Plant signaling & behavior, vol. 8, iss. 2, p. e23136, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{ellouzi_increased_2013,
    title = {Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol-deficient {Arabidopsis} mutants growing in a hydroponic system},
    volume = {8},
    issn = {null},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/psb.23136},
    doi = {10.4161/psb.23136},
    abstract = {Recent studies suggest that tocopherols could play physiological roles in salt tolerance but the mechanisms are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed changes in growth, mineral and oxidative status in vte1 and vte4 Arabidopsis thaliana mutants exposed to salt stress. vte1 and vte4 mutants lack α-tocopherol, but only the vte1 mutant is additionally deficient in γ-tocopherol. Results showed that a deficiency in vitamin E leads to reduced growth and increased oxidative stress in hydroponically-grown plants. This effect was observed at early stages, not only in rosettes but also in roots. The vte1 mutant was more sensitive to salt-induced oxidative stress than the wild type and the vte4 mutant. Salt sensitivity was associated with (i) high contents of Na+, (ii) reduced efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm ratio) and (iii) more pronounced oxidative stress as indicated by increased hydrogen peroxide and malondialdeyde levels. The vte 4 mutant, which accumulates γ- instead of α-tocopherol showed an intermediate sensitivity to salt stress between the wild type and the vte1 mutant. Contents of abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were higher in the vte1 mutant than the vte4 mutant and wild type. It is concluded that vitamin E-deficient plants show an increased sensitivity to salt stress both in rosettes and roots, therefore indicating the positive role of tocopherols in stress tolerance, not only by minimizing oxidative stress, but also controlling Na+/K+ homeostasis and hormonal balance.},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Signaling \& Behavior},
    author = {Ellouzi, Hasna and Hamed, Karim Ben and Cela, Jana and Müller, Maren and Abdelly, Chedly and Munné-Bosch, Sergi},
    month = feb,
    year = {2013},
    pmid = {23299430},
    keywords = {hormones, hydrogen peroxide, oxidative stress, Salt stress, vitamin E},
    pages = {e23136},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/HTA9ZAVA/Ellouzi et al. - 2013 - Increased sensitivity to salt stress in tocopherol.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/GFAFQ842/psb.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] I. Bricchi, A. Occhipinti, C. M. Bertea, S. A. Zebelo, C. Brillada, F. Verrillo, C. De Castro, A. Molinaro, C. Faulkner, A. J. Maule, and M. E. Maffei, “Separation of early and late responses to herbivory in Arabidopsis by changing plasmodesmal function,” The plant journal, vol. 73, iss. 1, pp. 14-25, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{bricchi_separation_2013,
    title = {Separation of early and late responses to herbivory in {Arabidopsis} by changing plasmodesmal function},
    volume = {73},
    issn = {1365-313X},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2012.05103.x/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1365-313X.2012.05103.x},
    abstract = {Herbivory results in an array of physiological changes in the host that are separable from the associated physical damage. We have made the surprising observation that an Arabidopsis line (pdko3) mutated in genes encoding plasmodesmal proteins is defective in some, but not all, of the typical plant responses to herbivory. We tested the responses of plasma transmembrane potential (Vm) depolarization, voltage gated K+ channel activity, cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]cyt and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (H2O2 and NO) release, shoot-to-root signaling, biosynthesis of the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and the elicitation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Following herbivory and the release of factors present in insect oral secretions (including a putative β-galactofuranose polysaccharide), both the pdko3 and wild type (WT) plants showed a increased accumulation of [Ca2+]cyt, NO and H2O2. In contrast, unlike WT plants, the mutant line showed an almost complete loss of voltage gated K+ channel activity and Vm depolarization, a loss of shoot-induced root-Vm depolarization, a loss of activation and regulation of gene expression of the JA defense pathway, and a much diminished release and altered profile of VOCs. The mutations in genes for plasmodesmal proteins have provided valuable genetic tools for the dissection of the complex spectrum of responses to herbivory and shown us that the responses to herbivory can be separated into a calcium-activated oxidative response and a K+-dependent Vm-activated jasmonate response associated with the release of VOCs.},
    language = {en},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {The Plant Journal},
    author = {Bricchi, Irene and Occhipinti, Andrea and Bertea, Cinzia M. and Zebelo, Simon A. and Brillada, Carla and Verrillo, Francesca and De Castro, Cristina and Molinaro, Antonio and Faulkner, Christine and Maule, Andrew J. and Maffei, Massimo E.},
    month = jan,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, calcium and reactive oxygen species signaling, Herbivory, jasmonates, plasmodesmata, potassium channels, Spodoptera littoralis, systemic signaling, volatile organic compounds},
    pages = {14--25},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/VGRJAJUM/Bricchi et al. - 2013 - Separation of early and late responses to herbivor.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/P6DQQGEP/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] A. Podgórska, K. Gieczewska, K. Łukawska-Kuźma, A. G. Rasmusson, P. Gardeström, and B. Szal, “Long-term ammonium nutrition of Arabidopsis increases the extrachloroplastic NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species level in leaves but does not impair photosynthetic capacity,” Plant, cell & environment, vol. 36, iss. 11, pp. 2034-2045, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{podgorska_long-term_2013,
    title = {Long-term ammonium nutrition of {Arabidopsis} increases the extrachloroplastic {NAD}({P}){H}/{NAD}({P})+ ratio and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species level in leaves but does not impair photosynthetic capacity},
    volume = {36},
    issn = {1365-3040},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pce.12113/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/pce.12113},
    abstract = {Ammonium nutrition has been suggested to be associated with alterations in the oxidation-reduction state of leaf cells. Herein, we show that ammonium nutrition in Arabidopsis thaliana increases leaf NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio, reactive oxygen species content and accumulation of biomolecules oxidized by free radicals. We used the method of rapid fractionation of protoplasts to analyse which cellular compartments were over-reduced under ammonium supply and revealed that observed changes in NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio involved only the extrachloroplastic fraction. We also showed that ammonium nutrition changes mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Our results indicate that the functional impairment associated with ammonium nutrition is mainly associated with redox reactions outside the chloroplast.},
    language = {en},
    number = {11},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant, Cell \& Environment},
    author = {Podgórska, Anna and Gieczewska, Katarzyna and Łukawska-Kuźma, Katarzyna and Rasmusson, Allan G. and Gardeström, Per and Szal, Bożena},
    month = nov,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {2034--2045},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/JPK4XM8M/Podgórska et al. - 2013 - Long-term ammonium nutrition of Arabidopsis increa.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/RIISFTFQ/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • M. H. Beale and J. L. Ward, “Metabolomics Reveals Hemiterpenoids as New Players in the Carbon–Nitrogen Economy,” in 50 Years of Phytochemistry Research, D. R. Gang, Ed., Springer International Publishing, 2013, pp. 1-20.
    [Bibtex]
    @incollection{beale_metabolomics_2013,
    series = {Recent {Advances} in {Phytochemistry}},
    title = {Metabolomics {Reveals} {Hemiterpenoids} as {New} {Players} in the {Carbon}–{Nitrogen} {Economy}},
    copyright = {©2013 Springer International Publishing Switzerland},
    isbn = {978-3-319-00580-5 978-3-319-00581-2},
    url = {http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-00581-2_1},
    abstract = {In plant metabolic engineering, a holistic view of plant metabolism can be provided by modern metabolomics. We discuss a recent application of combined nuclear magnetic resonance–mass spectrometry (NMR–MS) metabolomics to hydroponically grown Arabidopsis thaliana as a means to study metabolic reprogramming in plant shoots in response to root stress. This led to the discovery of a novel, specifically regulated overflow from the chloroplastic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway that resulted in the biosynthesis of hemiterpenoid glycosides (HTGs) from hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate. The induction of these compounds in leaves is quite specific to a few conditions that lead to low foliar nitrate, implicating the involvement of this anion in the molecular switch. The reprogramming of isoprenoid metabolism in shoots was also correlated with the production of the phenylpropanoids scopolin and coniferin in roots. These results are discussed against a survey of the literature on hemiterpenoids, including isoprene, in order to develop a unified model of metabolic switching of the MEP pathway that allows carbon overflow from a number of points, depending on the species.},
    language = {en},
    number = {43},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    booktitle = {50 {Years} of {Phytochemistry} {Research}},
    publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
    author = {Beale, Michael H. and Ward, Jane L.},
    editor = {Gang, David R.},
    year = {2013},
    note = {DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-00581-2\_1},
    keywords = {abiotic stress, Coniferin, Ecology, Hemiterpenoids, Mass spectrometry, MEP pathway, Metabolic regulation, Metabolomics, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Plant Biochemistry, Plant Ecology, Scopolin},
    pages = {1--20},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/P33QISG4/Beale and Ward - 2013 - Metabolomics Reveals Hemiterpenoids as New Players.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/A5UTFDT3/978-3-319-00581-2_1.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] H. Lenz, V. Dombinov, J. Dreistein, M. R. Reinhard, M. Gebert, and V. Knoop, “Magnesium Deficiency Phenotypes Upon Multiple Knockout of Arabidopsis thaliana MRS2 Clade B Genes Can be Ameliorated by Concomitantly Reduced Calcium Supply,” Plant and cell physiology, vol. 54, iss. 7, pp. 1118-1131, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{lenz_magnesium_2013,
    title = {Magnesium {Deficiency} {Phenotypes} {Upon} {Multiple} {Knockout} of {Arabidopsis} thaliana {MRS}2 {Clade} {B} {Genes} {Can} be {Ameliorated} by {Concomitantly} {Reduced} {Calcium} {Supply}},
    volume = {54},
    issn = {0032-0781},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/pcp/article/54/7/1118/1847314/Magnesium-Deficiency-Phenotypes-Upon-Multiple},
    doi = {10.1093/pcp/pct062},
    number = {7},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant and Cell Physiology},
    author = {Lenz, Henning and Dombinov, Vitalij and Dreistein, Julia and Reinhard, Martin R. and Gebert, Michael and Knoop, Volker},
    month = jul,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {1118--1131},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/4H7F9NU9/Lenz et al. - 2013 - Magnesium Deficiency Phenotypes Upon Multiple Knoc.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/D7S2HSJT/Magnesium-Deficiency-Phenotypes-Upon-Multiple.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] J. Wang, Y. Koo, A. Alexander, Y. Yang, S. Westerhof, Q. Zhang, J. L. Schnoor, V. L. Colvin, J. Braam, and P. J. J. Alvarez, “Phytostimulation of Poplars and Arabidopsis Exposed to Silver Nanoparticles and Ag+ at Sublethal Concentrations,” Environmental science & technology, vol. 47, iss. 10, pp. 5442-5449, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{wang_phytostimulation_2013,
    title = {Phytostimulation of {Poplars} and {Arabidopsis} {Exposed} to {Silver} {Nanoparticles} and {Ag}+ at {Sublethal} {Concentrations}},
    volume = {47},
    issn = {0013-936X},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es4004334},
    doi = {10.1021/es4004334},
    abstract = {The increasing likelihood of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) releases to the environment highlights the importance of understanding AgNP interactions with plants, which are cornerstones of most ecosystems. In this study, poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra) and Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed hydroponically to nanoparticles of different sizes (PEG-coated 5 and 10 nm AgNPs, and carbon-coated 25 nm AgNPs) or silver ions (Ag+, added as AgNO3) at a wide range of concentrations (0.01 to 100 mg/L). Whereas all forms of silver were phytotoxic above a specific concentration, a stimulatory effect was observed on root elongation, fresh weight, and evapotranspiration of both plants at a narrow range of sublethal concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar). Plants were most susceptible to the toxic effects of Ag+ (1 mg/L for poplar, 0.05 mg/L for Arabidopsis), but AgNPs also showed some toxicity at higher concentrations (e.g., 100 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar, 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for Arabidopsis) and this susceptibility increased with decreasing AgNP size. Both poplars and Arabidopsis accumulated silver, but silver distribution in shoot organs varied between plant species. Arabidopsis accumulated silver primarily in leaves (at 10-fold higher concentrations than in the stem or flower tissues), whereas poplars accumulated silver at similar concentrations in leaves and stems. Within the particle subinhibitory concentration range, silver accumulation in poplar tissues increased with exposure concentration and with smaller AgNP size. However, compared to larger AgNPs, the faster silver uptake associated with smaller AgNPs was offset by their toxic effect on evapotranspiration, which was exerted at lower concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for poplar). Overall, the observed phytostimulatory effects preclude generalizations about the phytotoxicity of AgNPs and encourage further mechanistic research.},
    number = {10},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental Science \& Technology},
    author = {Wang, Jing and Koo, Yeonjong and Alexander, Anne and Yang, Yu and Westerhof, Samantha and Zhang, Qingbo and Schnoor, Jerald L. and Colvin, Vicki L. and Braam, Janet and Alvarez, Pedro J. J.},
    month = may,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {5442--5449},
    file = {ACS Full Text PDF w/ Links:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/KX559ZEH/Wang et al. - 2013 - Phytostimulation of Poplars and Arabidopsis Expose.pdf:application/pdf;ACS Full Text Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/PRDQPAGP/es4004334.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] R. Horn, I. Chudobova, U. Hänsel, D. Herwartz, P. von Koskull-Döring, and S. Schillberg, “Simultaneous Treatment with Tebuconazole and Abscisic Acid Induces Drought and Salinity Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana by Maintaining Key Plastid Protein Levels,” Journal of proteome research, vol. 12, iss. 3, pp. 1266-1281, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{horn_simultaneous_2013,
    title = {Simultaneous {Treatment} with {Tebuconazole} and {Abscisic} {Acid} {Induces} {Drought} and {Salinity} {Stress} {Tolerance} in {Arabidopsis} thaliana by {Maintaining} {Key} {Plastid} {Protein} {Levels}},
    volume = {12},
    issn = {1535-3893},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr300931u},
    doi = {10.1021/pr300931u},
    abstract = {Arabidopsis thaliana plants were treated simultaneously with the fungicide tebuconazole and the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). We carried out comparative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis against untreated controls under different stress regimes. The chemicals were applied 24 h before the onset of drought stress (removal of the nutrient medium) or salinity stress (hydroponic culture using 150 mM NaCl), and samples were taken during the stress treatments and after a 24 h recovery period. The combined chemical treatment protected plants against both forms of stress. Difference in-gel electrophoresis revealed 18 and 34 unique protein markers representing induced tolerance to drought and salinity stress, respectively. Most of the markers represented plastid functions (such as CO2 fixation and photosystem II activity), and their abundance was reduced under stress conditions but maintained at near normal levels in the treated plants. The corresponding transcripts were reduced in abundance primarily under drought stress but not salinity stress, indicating that the signal transduction pathways activated by tebuconazole/ABA treatment depend on the nature of the stress stimulus.},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Proteome Research},
    author = {Horn, Ruth and Chudobova, Ivana and Hänsel, Ulrike and Herwartz, Denise and Koskull-Döring, Pascal von and Schillberg, Stefan},
    month = mar,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {1266--1281},
    file = {ACS Full Text PDF w/ Links:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/EIZFX5N8/Horn et al. - 2013 - Simultaneous Treatment with Tebuconazole and Absci.pdf:application/pdf;ACS Full Text Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/6E6Q49JJ/pr300931u.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] S. J. Conn, B. Hocking, M. Dayod, B. Xu, A. Athman, S. Henderson, L. Aukett, V. Conn, M. K. Shearer, S. Fuentes, S. D. Tyerman, and M. Gilliham, “Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants,” Plant methods, vol. 9, p. 4, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{conn_protocol:_2013,
    title = {Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of {Arabidopsis} thaliana and other plants},
    volume = {9},
    issn = {1746-4811},
    shorttitle = {Protocol},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1746-4811-9-4},
    doi = {10.1186/1746-4811-9-4},
    abstract = {Hydroponic growth systems are a convenient platform for studying whole plant physiology. However, we found through trialling systems as they are described in the literature that our experiments were frequently confounded by factors that affected plant growth, including algal contamination and hypoxia. We also found the way in which the plants were grown made them poorly amenable to a number of common physiological assays.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Methods},
    author = {Conn, Simon J. and Hocking, Bradleigh and Dayod, Maclin and Xu, Bo and Athman, Asmini and Henderson, Sam and Aukett, Lucy and Conn, Vanessa and Shearer, Monique K. and Fuentes, Sigfredo and Tyerman, Stephen D. and Gilliham, Matthew},
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {ACA2, Arabidopsis, CAX1, CAX2, Gas exchange, Hydroponics, Plant nutrition, Transient transformation, VHA-α},
    pages = {4},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/RPZ3P7BE/Conn et al. - 2013 - Protocol optimising hydroponic growth systems for.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/8GG778R6/1746-4811-9-4.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] F. McLoughlin, C. S. Galvan-Ampudia, M. M. Julkowska, L. Caarls, D. van der Does, C. Laurière, T. Munnik, M. A. Haring, and C. Testerink, “The Snf1-related protein kinases SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.10 are involved in maintenance of root system architecture during salt stress,” The plant journal, vol. 72, iss. 3, pp. 436-449, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mcloughlin_snf1-related_2012,
    title = {The {Snf}1-related protein kinases {SnRK}2.4 and {SnRK}2.10 are involved in maintenance of root system architecture during salt stress},
    volume = {72},
    issn = {1365-313X},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2012.05089.x/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1365-313X.2012.05089.x},
    abstract = {The sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) family represents a unique family of plant-specific protein kinases implicated in cellular signalling in response to osmotic stress. In our studies, we observed that two class 1 SnRK2 kinases, SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.10, are rapidly and transiently activated in Arabidopsis roots after exposure to salt. Under saline conditions, snrk2.4 knockout mutants had a reduced primary root length, while snrk2.10 mutants exhibited a reduction in the number of lateral roots. The reduced lateral root density was found to be a combinatory effect of a decrease in the number of lateral root primordia and an increase in the number of arrested lateral root primordia. The phenotypes were in agreement with the observed expression patterns of genomic yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusions of SnRK2.10 and -2.4, under control of their native promoter sequences. SnRK2.10 was found to be expressed in the vascular tissue at the base of a developing lateral root, whereas SnRK2.4 was expressed throughout the root, with higher expression in the vascular system. Salt stress triggered a rapid re-localization of SnRK2.4–YFP from the cytosol to punctate structures in root epidermal cells. Differential centrifugation experiments of isolated Arabidopsis root proteins confirmed recruitment of endogenous SnRK2.4/2.10 to membranes upon exposure to salt, supporting their observed binding affinity for the phospholipid phosphatidic acid. Together, our results reveal a role for SnRK2.4 and -2.10 in root growth and architecture in saline conditions.},
    language = {en},
    number = {3},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {The Plant Journal},
    author = {McLoughlin, Fionn and Galvan-Ampudia, Carlos S. and Julkowska, Magdalena M. and Caarls, Lotte and van der Does, Dieuwertje and Laurière, Christiane and Munnik, Teun and Haring, Michel A. and Testerink, Christa},
    month = nov,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, cellular membrane targeting, lateral root emergence, primary root growth, protein kinase activity, salinity stress, Snf1-related protein kinase},
    pages = {436--449},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/X44IPDAK/McLoughlin et al. - 2012 - The Snf1-related protein kinases SnRK2.4 and SnRK2.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/E4QWBPQA/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Boudsocq, M. Droillard, L. Regad, and C. Laurière, “Characterization of Arabidopsis calcium-dependent protein kinases: activated or not by calcium?,” Biochemical journal, vol. 447, iss. 2, pp. 291-299, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{boudsocq_characterization_2012,
    title = {Characterization of {Arabidopsis} calcium-dependent protein kinases: activated or not by calcium?},
    volume = {447},
    copyright = {© The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 Biochemical Society},
    issn = {0264-6021, 1470-8728},
    shorttitle = {Characterization of {Arabidopsis} calcium-dependent protein kinases},
    url = {http://www.biochemj.org/content/447/2/291},
    doi = {10.1042/BJ20112072},
    abstract = {CDPKs (calcium-dependent protein kinases), which contain both calmodulin-like calcium binding and serine/threonine protein kinase domains, are only present in plants and some protozoans. Upon activation by a stimulus, they transduce the signal through phosphorylation cascades to induce downstream responses, including transcriptional regulation. To understand the functional specificities of CDPKs, 14 Arabidopsis CPKs (CDPKs in plants) representative of the three main subgroups were characterized at the biochemical level, using HA (haemagglutinin)-tagged CPKs expressed in planta. Most of them were partially or mainly associated with membranes, in agreement with acylation predictions. Importantly, CPKs displayed highly variable calcium-dependences for their kinase activities: seven CPKs from subgroups 1 and 2 were clearly sensitive to calcium with different intensities, whereas six CPKs from subgroup 3 exhibited low or no calcium sensitivity to two generic substrates. Interestingly, this apparent calcium-independence correlated with significant alterations in the predicted EF-hands of these kinases, although they all bound calcium. The noticeable exception, CPK25, was calcium-independent owing to the absence of functional EF-hands. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that calcium binding differentially affects CDPK isoforms that may be activated by distinct molecular mechanisms.},
    language = {en},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Biochemical Journal},
    author = {Boudsocq, Marie and Droillard, Marie-Jo and Regad, Leslie and Laurière, Christiane},
    month = oct,
    year = {2012},
    pmid = {22827269},
    pages = {291--299},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/S2KJVJTR/Boudsocq et al. - 2012 - Characterization of Arabidopsis calcium-dependent .pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/MW52I8GN/291.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] E. Koen, K. Szymańska, A. Klinguer, G. Dobrowolska, A. Besson-Bard, and D. Wendehenne, “Nitric oxide and glutathione impact the expression of iron uptake- and iron transport-related genes as well as the content of metals in A. thaliana plants grown under iron deficiency,” Plant signaling & behavior, vol. 7, iss. 10, pp. 1246-1250, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{koen_nitric_2012,
    title = {Nitric oxide and glutathione impact the expression of iron uptake- and iron transport-related genes as well as the content of metals in {A}. thaliana plants grown under iron deficiency},
    volume = {7},
    issn = {null},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/psb.21548},
    doi = {10.4161/psb.21548},
    abstract = {Mounting evidence indicate that nitric oxide (NO) acts as a signaling molecule mediating iron deficiency responses through the upregulation of the expression of iron uptake-related genes. Accordingly, NO donors such as nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) were reported to improve the fitness of plants grown under iron deficiency. Here, we showed that glutathione, a by-product of GSNO, triggered the upregulation of the expression of iron uptake- and transport-related gene and an increase of iron concentration in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings facing iron deficiency. Furthermore, we provided evidence that under iron deficiency, NO released by GSNO did not improve the root iron concentration but impacted the content of copper. Collectively, our data highlight the complexity of interpreting data based on the use of NO donors when investigating the role of NO in iron homeostasis.},
    number = {10},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant Signaling \& Behavior},
    author = {Koen, Emmanuel and Szymańska, Katarzyna and Klinguer, Agnès and Dobrowolska, Grażyna and Besson-Bard, Angélique and Wendehenne, David},
    month = oct,
    year = {2012},
    pmid = {22902693},
    keywords = {glutathione, iron, iron deficiency, nitric oxide, nitrosoglutathione},
    pages = {1246--1250},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/TBSFFH44/Koen et al. - 2012 - Nitric oxide and glutathione impact the expression.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/9TUD9HN9/psb.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] D. L. Slomberg and M. H. Schoenfisch, “Silica Nanoparticle Phytotoxicity to Arabidopsis thaliana,” Environmental science & technology, vol. 46, iss. 18, pp. 10247-10254, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{slomberg_silica_2012,
    title = {Silica {Nanoparticle} {Phytotoxicity} to {Arabidopsis} thaliana},
    volume = {46},
    issn = {0013-936X},
    url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es300949f},
    doi = {10.1021/es300949f},
    abstract = {The phytotoxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) was evaluated as a function of particle size (14, 50, and 200 nm), concentration (250 and 1000 mg L–1), and surface composition toward Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown hydroponically for 3 and 6 weeks. Reduced development and chlorosis were observed for plants exposed to highly negative SiNPs (−20.3 and −31.9 mV for the 50 and 200 nm SiNPs, respectively) regardless of particle concentration when not controlling pH of the hydroponic medium, which resulted in increased alkalinity (∼pH 8). Particles were no longer toxic to the plants at either concentration upon calcination or removal of surface silanols from the SiNP surface, or adjusting the pH of the growth medium to pH 5.8. The phytotoxic effects observed for the negatively charged 50 and 200 nm SiNPs were attributed to pH effects and the adsorption of macro- and micro-nutrients to the silica surface. Size-dependent uptake of the nanoparticles by the plants was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) with plant roots containing 32.0, 1.85, and 7.00 × 10–3 mg Si·kg tissue–1/nm3 (normalized for SiNP volume) for the 14, 50, and 200 nm SiNPs respectively, after 6 weeks exposure at 1000 ppm (pH 5.8). This study demonstrates that the silica scaffolds are not phytotoxic up to 1000 ppm despite significant uptake of the SiNPs (14, 50, and 200 nm) into the root system of A. thaliana.},
    number = {18},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental Science \& Technology},
    author = {Slomberg, Danielle L. and Schoenfisch, Mark H.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2012},
    pages = {10247--10254},
    file = {ACS Full Text PDF w/ Links:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CIKJIEAR/Slomberg and Schoenfisch - 2012 - Silica Nanoparticle Phytotoxicity to Arabidopsis t.pdf:application/pdf;ACS Full Text Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/QBPJKXC4/es300949f.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] Y. Chen and F. Brandizzi, “AtIRE1a/AtIRE1b and AGB1 independently control two essential unfolded protein response pathways in Arabidopsis,” The plant journal, vol. 69, iss. 2, pp. 266-277, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{chen_atire1a/atire1b_2012,
    title = {{AtIRE}1A/{AtIRE}1B and {AGB}1 independently control two essential unfolded protein response pathways in {Arabidopsis}},
    volume = {69},
    issn = {1365-313X},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2011.04788.x/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1365-313X.2011.04788.x},
    abstract = {The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has the ability to maintain the balance between demand for and synthesis of secretory proteins. To ensure protein-folding homeostasis in the ER, cells invoke signaling pathways known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). To initiate UPR, yeasts largely rely on a conserved sensor, IRE1. In metazoans, there are at least three independent UPR signalling pathways. Some UPR transducers have been identified in plants, but no genetic interaction among them has yet been examined. The Arabidopsis genome encodes two IRE1 sequence homologs, AtIRE1A and AtIRE1B. Here we provide evidence that AtIRE1A and AtIRE1B have overlapping functions that are essential for the plant UPR. A double mutant of AtIRE1A and AtIRE1B, atire1a atire1b, showed reduced ER stress tolerance and a compromised UPR activation phenotype. We have also established that Arabidopsis AGB1, a subunit of the ubiquitous heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein family, and AtIRE1A/AtIRE1B independently control two essential plant UPR pathways. By demonstrating that atire1a atire1b has a short root phenotype that is enhanced by an agb1 loss-of-function mutation, we have identified a role for UPR transducers in organ growth regulation.},
    language = {en},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {The Plant Journal},
    author = {Chen, Yani and Brandizzi, Federica},
    month = jan,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, endoplasmic reticulum stress, GTP-binding protein β1, inositol-requiring enzyme 1, Root, unfolded protein response},
    pages = {266--277},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/VE7QDKQJ/Chen and Brandizzi - 2012 - AtIRE1AAtIRE1B and AGB1 independently control two.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/AFRXXMW7/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] L. Sobkowiak, A. Jarmolowski, W. Karlowski, and Z. Szweykowska-Kulinska, “Non-Canonical Processing of Arabidopsis pri-miR319a/b/c Generates Additional microRNAs to Target One RAP2.12 mRNA Isoform,” Frontiers in plant science, vol. 3, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{sobkowiak_non-canonical_2012,
    title = {Non-{Canonical} {Processing} of {Arabidopsis} pri-{miR}319a/b/c {Generates} {Additional} {microRNAs} to {Target} {One} {RAP}2.12 {mRNA} {Isoform}},
    volume = {3},
    issn = {1664-462X},
    url = {http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fpls.2012.00046/abstract},
    doi = {10.3389/fpls.2012.00046},
    abstract = {Arabidopsis miR319a/b/c primary transcripts are unusual because of the presence of a long stem and loop structure containing functional miR319a/b/c molecules. In our experiments carried out using HTS, we have shown that additional microRNAs, miR319a.2/b.2/c.2 are generated from the upper part of the same hairpin structure. We have also found cognate miRNAa.2*/b.2* to be present in the HTS results with considerably lower number of reads. Northern hybridization revealed thatmiR319b.2 is mainly expressed in 35-day old plant rosette leaves, as well as in stem and inflorescences of 42 and 53 day-old plants. Moreover, it carries multiple signatures of a functional microRNA: its biogenesis is Hyl-1 dependent, (ii) it is incorporated in substantial amount into RISC complexes containing Ago1, Ago2, or Ago4 protein, (iii) 24nt long species of miR319b.2 have been found in inflorescences where they are more abundant than 21nt miR319b.2 species,(iv) it is present in various ratios to miR319b during plant development, suggesting the existence of regulatory mechanism responsible for its biogenesis/processing, (v) there is observed cross-species conservation of the miR319a/b/c stem nucleotide sequence extending beyond mature microRNA region, (vi) all evidence suggests that intron-containing RAP2.12 mRNA isoform is the target for miR319b.2. All these features prompt us to claim miR319b.2 as a functional microRNA molecule.},
    language = {English},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Frontiers in Plant Science},
    author = {Sobkowiak, Lukasz and Jarmolowski, Artur and Karlowski, Wojciech and Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia},
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {Gene expression, microRNA biogenesis, miRNA, pri-miRNA, RAP2.12, Splicing},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/H8T9VGPE/Sobkowiak et al. - 2012 - Non-Canonical Processing of Arabidopsis pri-miR319.pdf:application/pdf}
    }
  • [DOI] J. L. Ward, J. M. Baker, A. M. Llewellyn, N. D. Hawkins, and M. H. Beale, “Metabolomic analysis of Arabidopsis reveals hemiterpenoid glycosides as products of a nitrate ion-regulated, carbon flux overflow,” Proceedings of the national academy of sciences, vol. 108, iss. 26, pp. 10762-10767, 2011.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{ward_metabolomic_2011,
    title = {Metabolomic analysis of {Arabidopsis} reveals hemiterpenoid glycosides as products of a nitrate ion-regulated, carbon flux overflow},
    volume = {108},
    issn = {0027-8424, 1091-6490},
    url = {http://www.pnas.org/content/108/26/10762},
    doi = {10.1073/pnas.1018875108},
    abstract = {An understanding of the balance between carbon and nitrogen assimilation in plants is key to future bioengineering for a range of applications. Metabolomic analysis of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, using combined NMR-MS revealed the presence of two hemiterpenoid glycosides that accumulated in leaf tissue, to {\textasciitilde}1\% dry weight under repeated nitrate-deficient conditions. The formation of these isoprenoids was correlated with leaf nitrate concentrations that could also be assayed in the metabolomic data using a unique flavonoid–nitrate mass spectral adduct. Analysis of leaf and root tissue from plants grown in hydroponics with a variety of root stressors identified the conditions under which the isoprenoid pathway in leaves was diverted to the hemiterpenoids. These compounds were strongly induced by root wounding or oxidative stress and weakly induced by potassium deficiency. Other stresses such as cold, saline, and osmotic stress did not induce the compounds. Replacement of nitrate with ammonia failed to suppress the formation of the hemiterpenoids, indicating that nitrate sensing was a key factor. Feeding of intermediates was used to study aspects of 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway regulation leading to hemiterpenoid formation. The formation of the hemiterpenoids in leaves was strongly correlated with the induction of the phenylpropanoids scopolin and coniferin in roots of the same plants. These shunts of photosynthetic carbon flow are discussed in terms of overflow mechanisms that have some parallels with isoprene production in tree species.},
    language = {en},
    number = {26},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
    author = {Ward, Jane L. and Baker, John M. and Llewellyn, Aimee M. and Hawkins, Nathaniel D. and Beale, Michael H.},
    month = jun,
    year = {2011},
    pmid = {21670294},
    pages = {10762--10767},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/33TNE7CX/Ward et al. - 2011 - Metabolomic analysis of Arabidopsis reveals hemite.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/ERDI5XBW/10762.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] K. Viehweger and G. Geipel, “Uranium accumulation and tolerance in Arabidopsis halleri under native versus hydroponic conditions,” Environmental and experimental botany, vol. 69, iss. 1, pp. 39-46, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{viehweger_uranium_2010,
    title = {Uranium accumulation and tolerance in {Arabidopsis} halleri under native versus hydroponic conditions},
    volume = {69},
    issn = {0098-8472},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0098847210000535},
    doi = {10.1016/j.envexpbot.2010.03.001},
    abstract = {Comparisons of uranium (U) accumulation and tolerance were conducted in terrestrial versus laboratory trials using an endemic, on a former U mining site growing Arabidopsis halleri. Sequential extractions of soil samples pointed out a correlation between the low bioavailability of the micronutrient iron and the uptake of the non-essential U. A prerequisite for the uptake of iron occurring mostly as Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides in this habitat is the reduction to Fe(II) at the root surface. This could be accompanied by a reduction of U because a similar reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) took place as it was shown by photoacoustic measurements. Arabidopsis plants growing in their native habitat accumulated ∼35 mg kg−1 (dry weight) U in roots and ∼17 mg kg−1 (dry weight) U in shoots. Concerning only the probable bioavailable U, the soil-to-plant transfer factor (TF) was around 1.2 for roots and 0.6 for shoots, respectively However, the uptake of hydroponically grown plants (laboratory trials) were 100-fold more in roots and 10-fold more in shoots compared with the native grown plants. This drastic increased U accumulation could be attributed to iron deficiency of hydroponically grown plants.
    To get more insights in mechanisms of U tolerance the tolerance index (TI) was calculated using root elongation measurements. In addition to this some impacts on basic photosynthetic traits, e.g. the chlorophyll content, were investigated. The chlorophyll a/b ratio was around 7 in native grown plants whereas the ratio of hydroponically grown dropped during the growth cycle due to the above mentioned lack of iron. Fluorescence spectra of chlorophyll extracts from U containing leaves revealed an additional peak assignable to a flavonoid. Thus, the reported data are a further indication that a deficiency of an essential metal can facilitate the uptake of non-essential metal.},
    number = {1},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Environmental and Experimental Botany},
    author = {Viehweger, Katrin and Geipel, Gerhard},
    month = sep,
    year = {2010},
    keywords = {Bioavailability, Hydroponics, photosynthesis, Sequential extraction, Soil, Uranium},
    pages = {39--46},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/TJG9A9TK/Viehweger and Geipel - 2010 - Uranium accumulation and tolerance in Arabidopsis .pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/PCDWUXF3/S0098847210000535.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] K. Patterson, T. Cakmak, A. Cooper, I. Lager, A. G. Rasmusson, and M. A. Escobar, “Distinct signalling pathways and transcriptome response signatures differentiate ammonium- and nitrate-supplied plants,” Plant, cell & environment, vol. 33, iss. 9, pp. 1486-1501, 2010.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{patterson_distinct_2010,
    title = {Distinct signalling pathways and transcriptome response signatures differentiate ammonium- and nitrate-supplied plants},
    volume = {33},
    issn = {1365-3040},
    url = {http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-3040.2010.02158.x/abstract},
    doi = {10.1111/j.1365-3040.2010.02158.x},
    abstract = {Nitrogen is the only macronutrient that is commonly available to plants in both oxidized and reduced forms, mainly nitrate and ammonium. The physiological and molecular effects of nitrate supply have been well studied, but comparatively little is known about ammonium nutrition and its differential effects on cell function and gene expression. We have used a physiologically realistic hydroponic growth system to compare the transcriptomes and redox status of the roots of ammonium- and nitrate-supplied Arabidopsis thaliana plants. While ∼60\% of nitrogen-regulated genes displayed common responses to both ammonium and nitrate, significant ‘nitrate-specific’ and ‘ammonium-specific’ gene sets were identified. Pathways involved in cytokinin response and reductant generation/distribution were specifically altered by nitrate, while a complex biotic stress response and changes in nodulin gene expression were characteristic of ammonium-supplied plants. Nitrate supply was associated with a rapid decrease in H2O2 production, potentially because of an increased export of reductant from the mitochondrial matrix. The underlying basis of the nitrate- and ammonium-specific patterns of gene expression appears to be different signals elaborated from each nitrogen source, including alterations in extracellular pH that are associated with ammonium uptake, downstream metabolites in the ammonium assimilation pathway, and the presence or absence of the nitrate ion.},
    language = {en},
    number = {9},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Plant, Cell \& Environment},
    author = {Patterson, Kurt and Cakmak, Turgay and Cooper, Andrew and Lager, Ida and Rasmusson, Allan G. and Escobar, Matthew A.},
    month = sep,
    year = {2010},
    keywords = {ammonium, Arabidopsis thaliana, nitrate, nitrogen, reactive oxygen species, redox balancing},
    pages = {1486--1501},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/KVCSWPQ7/Patterson et al. - 2010 - Distinct signalling pathways and transcriptome res.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/B8JZCEMB/abstract.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] M. Gebert, K. Meschenmoser, S. Svidová, J. Weghuber, R. Schweyen, K. Eifler, H. Lenz, K. Weyand, and V. Knoop, “A Root-Expressed Magnesium Transporter of the MRS2/MGT Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana Allows for Growth in Low-Mg2+ Environments,” The plant cell, vol. 21, iss. 12, pp. 4018-4030, 2009.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{gebert_root-expressed_2009,
    title = {A {Root}-{Expressed} {Magnesium} {Transporter} of the {MRS}2/{MGT} {Gene} {Family} in {Arabidopsis} thaliana {Allows} for {Growth} in {Low}-{Mg}2+ {Environments}},
    volume = {21},
    issn = {, 1532-298X},
    url = {http://www.plantcell.org/content/21/12/4018},
    doi = {10.1105/tpc.109.070557},
    abstract = {The MRS2/MGT gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana belongs to the superfamily of CorA-MRS2-ALR-type membrane proteins. Proteins of this type are characterized by a GMN tripeptide motif (Gly-Met-Asn) at the end of the first of two C-terminal transmembrane domains and have been characterized as magnesium transporters. Using the recently established mag-fura-2 system allowing direct measurement of Mg2+ uptake into mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we find that all members of the Arabidopsis family complement the corresponding yeast mrs2 mutant. Highly different patterns of tissue-specific expression were observed for the MRS2/MGT family members in planta. Six of them are expressed in root tissues, indicating a possible involvement in plant magnesium supply and distribution after uptake from the soil substrate. Homozygous T-DNA insertion knockout lines were obtained for four members of the MRS2/MGT gene family. A strong, magnesium-dependent phenotype of growth retardation was found for mrs2-7 when Mg2+ concentrations were lowered to 50 μM in hydroponic cultures. Ectopic overexpression of MRS2-7 from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter results in complementation and increased biomass accumulation. Green fluorescent protein reporter gene fusions indicate a location of MRS2-7 in the endomembrane system. Hence, contrary to what is frequently found in analyses of plant gene families, a single gene family member knockout results in a strong, environmentally dependent phenotype.},
    language = {en},
    number = {12},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {The Plant Cell},
    author = {Gebert, Michael and Meschenmoser, Karoline and Svidová, Soňa and Weghuber, Julian and Schweyen, Rudolf and Eifler, Karolin and Lenz, Henning and Weyand, Katrin and Knoop, Volker},
    month = dec,
    year = {2009},
    pmid = {19966073},
    pages = {4018--4030},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/WPR7MSHV/Gebert et al. - 2009 - A Root-Expressed Magnesium Transporter of the MRS2.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/4N8NTJMV/4018.html:text/html}
    }

[top]

Brachypodium

  • [DOI] G. Coussens, S. Aesaert, W. Verelst, M. Demeulenaere, S. De Buck, E. Njuguna, D. Inzé, and M. Van Lijsebettens, “Brachypodium distachyon promoters as efficient building blocks for transgenic research in maize,” Journal of experimental botany, vol. 63, iss. 11, pp. 4263-4273, 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{coussens_brachypodium_2012,
    title = {Brachypodium distachyon promoters as efficient building blocks for transgenic research in maize},
    volume = {63},
    issn = {0022-0957},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/63/11/4263/603584/Brachypodium-distachyon-promoters-as-efficient},
    doi = {10.1093/jxb/ers113},
    number = {11},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
    author = {Coussens, Griet and Aesaert, Stijn and Verelst, Wim and Demeulenaere, Marlies and De Buck, Sylvie and Njuguna, Elizabeth and Inzé, Dirk and Van Lijsebettens, Mieke},
    month = jun,
    year = {2012},
    keywords = {brachypodium},
    pages = {4263--4273},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/P58HQIE7/Coussens et al. - 2012 - Brachypodium distachyon promoters as efficient bui.pdf:application/pdf}
    }

[top]

Rice

  • [DOI] S. Mishra, J. Mattusch, and R. Wennrich, “Accumulation and transformation of inorganic and organic arsenic in rice and role of thiol-complexation to restrict their translocation to shoot,” Scientific reports, vol. 7, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mishra_accumulation_2017,
    title = {Accumulation and transformation of inorganic and organic arsenic in rice and role of thiol-complexation to restrict their translocation to shoot},
    volume = {7},
    issn = {2045-2322},
    url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5240135/},
    doi = {10.1038/srep40522},
    abstract = {Environmental contamination of arsenic (As) and its accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) is of serious human health concern. In planta speciation of As is an important tool to understand As metabolism in plants. In the present study, we investigated root to shoot As translocation and speciation in rice exposed to inorganic and methylated As. Arsenate (AsV) and methylarsonate (MAV) were efficiently reduced to arsenite (AsIII) and MAIII, respectively in rice root and shoot but no trivalent form of dimethylarsinate (DMAV) was detected. Further, up to 48 and 83\% of root As in AsV and MAV exposed plants, respectively were complexed with various thiols showing up to 20 and 16 As species, respectively. Several mixed As- and MA-complexes with hydroxymethyl-phytochelatin, DesGly-phytochelatin, hydroxymethyl-GSH and cysteine were identified in rice. Despite high complexation in roots, more As was translocated to shoots in MAV exposed plants than AsV, with shoot/root As transfer factor being in order DMAV {\textgreater} MAV {\textgreater} AsV. Moreover, in shoots 78\% MAIII and 71\% AsIII were present as weakly bound species which is alarming, as MAIII has been found to be more cytotoxic than AsIII for human and it could also be an important factor inducing straighthead (spikelet sterility disorder) in rice.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Scientific Reports},
    author = {Mishra, Seema and Mattusch, Jürgen and Wennrich, Rainer},
    month = jan,
    year = {2017},
    pmid = {28094280},
    pmcid = {PMC5240135},
    file = {PubMed Central Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/CZ4DAXH9/Mishra et al. - 2017 - Accumulation and transformation of inorganic and o.pdf:application/pdf}
    }

[top]

Tobacco

  • [DOI] K. Mazari, P. Landa, S. Přerostová, K. Müller, R. Vaňková, P. Soudek, and T. Vaněk, “Thorium impact on tobacco root transcriptome,” Journal of hazardous materials, vol. 325, pp. 163-169, 2017.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{mazari_thorium_2017,
    title = {Thorium impact on tobacco root transcriptome},
    volume = {325},
    issn = {0304-3894},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304389416311013},
    doi = {10.1016/j.jhazmat.2016.11.064},
    abstract = {Thorium is natural actinide metal with potential use in nuclear energetics. Contamination by thorium, originated from mining activities or spills, represents environmental risk due to its radioactivity and chemical toxicity. A promising approach for cleaning of contaminated areas is phytoremediation, which need to be based, however, on detail understanding of the thorium effects on plants. In this study we investigated transcriptomic response of tobacco roots exposed to 200 μM thorium for one week. Thorium application resulted in up-regulation of 152 and down-regulation of 100 genes (p-value \<0.01, fold change ≥ 2). The stimulated genes were involved in components of jasmonic acid and salicylic acid signaling pathways and various abiotic (e.g. oxidative stress) and biotic stress (e.g. pathogens, wounding) responsive genes. Further, up-regulation of phosphate starvation genes and down-regulation of genes involved in phytic acid biosynthesis indicated that thorium disturbed phosphate uptake or signaling. Also expression of iron responsive genes was influenced. Negative regulation of several aquaporins indicated disturbance of water homeostasis. Genes potentially involved in thorium transport could be zinc-induced facilitator ZIF2, plant cadmium resistance PCR2, and ABC transporter ABCG40. This study provides the first insight at the processes in plants exposed to thorium.},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Hazardous Materials},
    author = {Mazari, Kateřina and Landa, Přemysl and Přerostová, Sylva and Müller, Karel and Vaňková, Radomíra and Soudek, Petr and Vaněk, Tomáš},
    month = mar,
    year = {2017},
    keywords = {Gene expression, Microarray, Nicotiana tabacum, Thorium, Toxicity},
    pages = {163--169},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/K5ZKXVNE/Mazari et al. - 2017 - Thorium impact on tobacco root transcriptome.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/THC8QCRW/S0304389416311013.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] H. Cawoy, M. Mariutto, G. Henry, C. Fisher, N. Vasilyeva, P. Thonart, J. Dommes, and M. Ongena, “Plant Defense Stimulation by Natural Isolates of Bacillus Depends on Efficient Surfactin Production,” Molecular plant-microbe interactions, vol. 27, iss. 2, pp. 87-100, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{cawoy_plant_2013,
    title = {Plant {Defense} {Stimulation} by {Natural} {Isolates} of {Bacillus} {Depends} on {Efficient} {Surfactin} {Production}},
    volume = {27},
    issn = {0894-0282},
    url = {http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/doi/abs/10.1094/MPMI-09-13-0262-R},
    doi = {10.1094/MPMI-09-13-0262-R},
    abstract = {Some plant-associated Bacillus strains produce induced systemic resistance (ISR) in the host, which contributes to their protective effect against phytopathogens. Little is known about the variety of elicitors responsible for ISR that are produced by Bacillus strains. Working with a particular strain, we have previously identified the surfactin lipopeptide as a main compound stimulating plant immune-related responses. However, with the perspective of developing Bacillus strains as biocontrol agents, it is important to establish whether a central role of surfactin is generally true for isolates belonging to the B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens complex. To that end, we set up a comparative study involving a range of natural strains. Their secretomes were first tested for triggering early defense events in cultured tobacco cells. Six isolates with contrasting activities were further evaluated for ISR in plants, based both on macroscopic disease reduction and on stimulation of the oxylipin pathway as defense mechanism. A strong correlation was found between defense-inducing activity and the amount of surfactin produced by the isolates. These results support the idea of a widespread role for surfactin as a nonvolatile elicitor formed by B. subtilis/amyloliquefaciens, and screening for strong surfactin producers among strains naturally secreting multiple antibiotics could be an efficient approach to select good candidates as biopesticides.},
    number = {2},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions},
    author = {Cawoy, Hélène and Mariutto, Martin and Henry, Guillaume and Fisher, Christophe and Vasilyeva, Natallia and Thonart, Philippe and Dommes, Jacques and Ongena, Marc},
    month = oct,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {87--100},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/XDAFNJP6/Cawoy et al. - 2013 - Plant Defense Stimulation by Natural Isolates of B.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/EMSCP6SJ/MPMI-09-13-0262-R.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] P. Soudek, D. Kufner, Š. Petrová, M. Mihaljevič, and T. Vaněk, “Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants,” Chemosphere, vol. 92, iss. 9, pp. 1090-1098, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{soudek_composition_2013,
    title = {Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium uptake by tobacco plants},
    volume = {92},
    issn = {0045-6535},
    url = {http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045653513001409},
    doi = {10.1016/j.chemosphere.2013.01.046},
    abstract = {The ability of thorium uptake as well as responses to heavy metal stress were tested in tobacco cultivar La Burley 21. Thorium was accumulated preferentially in the root system. The presence of citric, tartaric and oxalic acids in hydroponic medium increased thorium accumulation in all plant organs. On the other hand, the addition of diamines and polyamines, the important antioxidants in plants, resulted in decrease of thorium accumulation, especially in the root system. Negative correlation was found between putrescine concentration and thorium accumulation. Nevertheless, the most important factor influencing the accumulation of thorium was the absence of phosphate ions in a hydroponic medium that caused more than 10-fold increase of thorium uptake in all plant parts. Accumulation and distribution of thorium was followed in six cultivars and 14 selected transformants. Cultivar La Barley 21 represented an average between the tested genotypes, having a very good distribution ratio between roots, stems and leaves.},
    number = {9},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Chemosphere},
    author = {Soudek, Petr and Kufner, Daniel and Petrová, Šárka and Mihaljevič, Martin and Vaněk, Tomáš},
    month = aug,
    year = {2013},
    keywords = {Citric acid, Phosphate, Plant uptake, Polyamines, Thorium, Tobacco},
    pages = {1090--1098},
    file = {ScienceDirect Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/I5F4K7RV/Soudek et al. - 2013 - Composition of hydroponic medium affects thorium u.pdf:application/pdf;ScienceDirect Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/P2IRIA35/S0045653513001409.html:text/html}
    }
  • [DOI] G. Moniuszko, M. Skoneczny, K. Zientara-Rytter, A. Wawrzyńska, D. Głów, S. M. Cristescu, F. J. M. Harren, and A. Sirko, “Tobacco LSU-like protein couples sulphur-deficiency response with ethylene signalling pathway,” Journal of experimental botany, vol. 64, iss. 16, pp. 5173-5182, 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @article{moniuszko_tobacco_2013,
    title = {Tobacco {LSU}-like protein couples sulphur-deficiency response with ethylene signalling pathway},
    volume = {64},
    issn = {0022-0957},
    url = {https://academic.oup.com/jxb/article/64/16/5173/593750/Tobacco-LSU-like-protein-couples-sulphur},
    doi = {10.1093/jxb/ert309},
    number = {16},
    urldate = {2017-03-29},
    journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
    author = {Moniuszko, Grzegorz and Skoneczny, Marek and Zientara-Rytter, Katarzyna and Wawrzyńska, Anna and Głów, Dawid and Cristescu, Simona M. and Harren, Frans J. M. and Sirko, Agnieszka},
    month = nov,
    year = {2013},
    pages = {5173--5182},
    file = {Full Text PDF:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/ZCAP5MZQ/Moniuszko et al. - 2013 - Tobacco LSU-like protein couples sulphur-deficienc.pdf:application/pdf;Snapshot:/Users/ptocquin/Dropbox/zotero/storage/C4ZQUHC5/Tobacco-LSU-like-protein-couples-sulphur.html:text/html}
    }

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